Author Topic: to drag or not to drag  (Read 2211 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

sandalwood

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 820
  • Karma: 74
to drag or not to drag
« on: October 12, 2012, 04:18:23 PM »
could not find a suitable thread in which to ask the following:

especially in slow, languid passages, do you ever find yourselves hesitating between employing ritenuto (or rallentando, etc) and writing with longer-value notes (concerning stretches of music from a fraction of a measure to more than a measure)?

hope the question makes sense :)

jmsuijkerbuijk

  • Guest
Re: to drag or not to drag
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2012, 03:31:35 AM »
I'm not sure what the advantages could be of writing a rallentando out in notes. To me it only makes sense if you want to raise the impression of one or a few voices slowing down over an ensemble that remains in tempo. If it concerns the entire ensemble, you should write rallentando instead of complicating the notation, unless you have a specific sequence of note values you wish to be played. E.g., a sequence of four sixteenths, tuplet of three eighths, two eights and a quarter gives the impression of a rallentando, but it isn't. In a rallentando every single note will be a tat longer than the previous one.

sandalwood

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 820
  • Karma: 74
Re: to drag or not to drag
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2012, 01:27:39 PM »
thanks  :)

Jamie Kowalski

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,459
  • Karma: 138
    • All Hands Music
Re: to drag or not to drag
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2012, 05:02:00 PM »
I've had to make this decision before. I suggest trying both routes, and using whichever ends up looking simpler on the page.

jmsuijkerbuijk

  • Guest
Re: to drag or not to drag
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2012, 01:44:01 AM »
I don't think that's possible, really. Either you want a rallentando or you want something that gives the impression of a rallentando, but isn't. That's not really a matter of 'how it looks on the page'.
And if it were, I'm pretty sure the word rallentando will look simpler in any circumstance than an augmentation of subsequent note values.

Ron

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,580
  • Karma: 189
    • The Music of Ronald J Brown
Re: to drag or not to drag
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2012, 07:05:45 AM »
I think it all boils down to what you want to acheive and where you are going. Lengthening note values changes the basic meter of the music. 2/2 is not simply twice the duration of 2/4--it is a new rythmical construct. The difference between 3/8 and 3/4 is enornmous no matter what the tempo. It is difficult to express in words the differences, but multiple musical examples should make it clear. 3/8 simply does not feel like 3/4 at any tempo.

So, if I want to go to a different meter, I'd change note values; if I wanted to slow down the current music, I'd use rallentando.
Ron
Rules? What rules?

Michel.R.E

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,771
  • Karma: 225
  • B.FA (composition) M.Mus (composition)
    • Les Éditions du Dos Blanc
Re: to drag or not to drag
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2012, 11:08:00 AM »
as Ron says, the difference between one notation and another is often worlds apart.

Writing longer note values can create an "effect" of a slight slowing down of the tempo.. but the music REMAINS "in tempo".
This is an important distinction.

While writing a rit./rall. is considerably more fluid and free. There is a "breathe" to a rit./rall. that is impossible to notate otherwise without excessive fussiness.
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"

sandalwood

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 820
  • Karma: 74
Re: to drag or not to drag
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2012, 06:48:17 PM »
very clarifying.

thank you all  :)