Author Topic: Parallel Octaves  (Read 6556 times)

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winknotes

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Re: Parallel Octaves
« Reply #15 on: May 15, 2012, 08:24:53 AM »
Michel alluded to Stravinsky and his "rule breaking".  Here's an example of an early work that when you listen to it you'll swear you're listening to Tchaikovsky or Rimsky Korsakov, but certainly not Stravinsky.  I think it's a good example of his writing within the tradition of his time.  I still hear one element at least that he uses in later works and that is there are several descending chromatic passages that remind me of sections of his ballets.  I believe this piece was written under the instruction of Rimsky Korsakov and didn't necessarily reflect Stravinsky's preferred aesthetic.

This movement also displays a clear long line which is another thread currently under discussion. 
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Michel.R.E

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Re: Parallel Octaves
« Reply #16 on: May 15, 2012, 08:45:57 AM »
kind of interesting to see how he went from this very Russian-nationalist Romantic school of writing to this the following year, and to this in another 2 years.

So is it a shock that this appeared a mere 3 years later?

Strawinski is a very interesting character.

most interesting is that you won't find a parallel 8ve in any of these works. Even the final one.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2012, 08:48:01 AM by Michel.R.E »
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winknotes

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Re: Parallel Octaves
« Reply #17 on: May 15, 2012, 10:33:42 AM »
kind of interesting to see how he went from this very Russian-nationalist Romantic school of writing to this the following year, and to this in another 2 years.

So is it a shock that this appeared a mere 3 years later?

Strawinski is a very interesting character.

most interesting is that you won't find a parallel 8ve in any of these works. Even the final one.

I don't understand the leap from Symphony No. 1 to Fireworks.  I guess it's a different aesthetic.  It's more impressionistic sounding than the symphony which to me sounds very classical. 
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Michel.R.E

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Re: Parallel Octaves
« Reply #18 on: May 15, 2012, 10:46:23 AM »
Strawinski had been in contact with Debussy when he went to Paris.

He even dedicated this to Debussy, who greatly admired the work. By the way, this piece was written BEFORE Le sacre du printemps, and in my opinion, some of the harmony is even more advanced than that of Sacre.
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Jamie Kowalski

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Re: Parallel Octaves
« Reply #19 on: May 15, 2012, 10:51:21 AM »
For a really interesting listen, try out Stravinsky's Song of the Nightingale. He started this before Firebird, and finished it after Sacre. It has quite the range of styles mashed together.

The thing that really surprised me was the first time I heard Agon. I couldn't believe the trajectory from Sacre to Symphony in C to Agon... just too weird!

winknotes

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Re: Parallel Octaves
« Reply #20 on: May 15, 2012, 11:00:53 AM »
Strawinski had been in contact with Debussy when he went to Paris.

He even dedicated this to Debussy, who greatly admired the work. By the way, this piece was written BEFORE Le sacre du printemps, and in my opinion, some of the harmony is even more advanced than that of Sacre.

That reminds me of his Symphony for Winds which I didn't realize he also dedicated to Debussy. 
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Michel.R.E

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Re: Parallel Octaves
« Reply #21 on: May 15, 2012, 11:04:17 AM »
Strawinski was one odd cookie.

He was really ALL over the place stylistically. and yet, there is a very pure thread of unique identity behind ALL of his music.

You hear neo-baroque, highly tonal Strawinski and there's no doubt that it is nul autre que Igor Strawinski.

You hear late-era, dodecaphonic, highly dissonant Strawinski, and again, none other than he could be the author.

I would call it a flaw in his character that he was so scattered all over the map as far as musical style is concerned... except it is all so purely genius that his eclecticism was simply a means for him to stretch those creative wings.
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"