Author Topic: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings  (Read 14266 times)

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FossMaNo1

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2012, 07:50:50 PM »
Okay, here's my 2nd try.

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C. Foster Payne
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calebrw

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2012, 01:41:41 AM »
Here is my attempt.

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Michel.R.E

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2012, 07:12:00 AM »
Okay, here's my 2nd try.

I don't think I would use the contrabass pizz in the 2nd measure.

why not have the cello, in the 2nd measure, start a half beat earlier, on the D?
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Michel.R.E

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2012, 07:14:01 AM »
Here is my attempt.

I suspect the opening measure would be a bit "muddy" sounding.

now, where's the Bb in the soprano in measure 2?
and the B nat. in measure 3?
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

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FossMaNo1

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #19 on: January 31, 2012, 07:55:20 AM »
I don't think I would use the contrabass pizz in the 2nd measure.

I'm not arguing, just wondering... why not?

As for the cello, I could see that.  Thanks!
C. Foster Payne
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"If you get to thinkin' you're a person of some influence, try orderin' somebody else's dog around."

Michel.R.E

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2012, 07:59:06 AM »
I don't think I would use the contrabass pizz in the 2nd measure.

I'm not arguing, just wondering... why not?

As for the cello, I could see that.  Thanks!

look carefully at the original.

it will explain why no bass pizz in measure 2, and also why some notes are missing from the proper range in measure 2 and 3.
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"

FossMaNo1

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #21 on: January 31, 2012, 09:07:38 AM »
I get it... it just fet odd not to include the bass.  Ah well...
C. Foster Payne
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Michel.R.E

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #22 on: January 31, 2012, 09:15:04 AM »
it's an important thing to get used to.. it isn't ALWAYS necessary to use all of a section.

depending on context, it can be ok to use only 1st violins and celli, or 1st violins and violas.

contrabasses are the same. use them where appropriate, not because you fear leaving them out.
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"

calebrw

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #23 on: January 31, 2012, 02:43:35 PM »
Here is my attempt.

I suspect the opening measure would be a bit "muddy" sounding.

now, where's the Bb in the soprano in measure 2?
and the B nat. in measure 3?
I wonder if this would sound better in a string quintet setting than the full orchestral strings. With the GPO4 solo string patches, I like how it sounds. I'm imagining in the context of a bit of pedal use by the piano player.

As for the notes, the Bb and the B-nature got moved to the viola part and now are on octave lower than they were in the original. When I'm a bit more awake, I don't necessarily agree with this voice leading.

I believe what I was trying to do, with both the Vln II and the viola part ending on G in the first measure, I didn't want parallel movement by them both going to C, so I chose the viola to go to C and the Vln II to go to Ab as a way to emphasize the fact that this isn't a standard chord in C major any more, the same reason, I doubled the G# in the third measure with the double bass harmonic an octave below.

Here is another treatment of the same with a bit different soprano line. I have to say I prefer the harmonic structure of the first way first, but to each his own as to what the ear hears.

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Ron

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #24 on: January 31, 2012, 04:40:57 PM »
Hi calebrw,
I am having some trouble reading your score. I don't understand the VC part at all (as well as measures 2&5 in Vln II). Why the appearance of rests in the mix? Your bowing instructions appear to be wrong as well. The down-beat is usually played with the down bow. I can't see any reason that you would want to reverse it here. Unless you have a very good reason, let the players decide whether to take something in an up or down bow. Also, a slur (1st violin, 1st measure) means to take it in one bow stroke, but you have it notated as an Up then Down bow--you can't have it both ways.
Ron
Rules? What rules?

Michel.R.E

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #25 on: March 02, 2012, 07:34:19 AM »
I wonder if this would sound better in a string quintet setting than the full orchestral strings. With the GPO4 solo string patches, I like how it sounds. I'm imagining in the context of a bit of pedal use by the piano player.

As for the notes, the Bb and the B-nature got moved to the viola part and now are on octave lower than they were in the original. When I'm a bit more awake, I don't necessarily agree with this voice leading.

I believe what I was trying to do, with both the Vln II and the viola part ending on G in the first measure, I didn't want parallel movement by them both going to C, so I chose the viola to go to C and the Vln II to go to Ab as a way to emphasize the fact that this isn't a standard chord in C major any more, the same reason, I doubled the G# in the third measure with the double bass harmonic an octave below.

Here is another treatment of the same with a bit different soprano line. I have to say I prefer the harmonic structure of the first way first, but to each his own as to what the ear hears.

Caleb, again, the problem is that you are breaking one of the conditions of the exercise.
By altering the soprano line, dropping part of it one octave, you are breaking the melodic contour and creating a "melody" that does not exist. While this might work in a development section, to have a melodic contour skip octaves between different instruments, in the strict context of orchestrating a passage, it doesn't work.

Your first example drops the last two notes of the melodic contour, while your 2nd example adds a new high C in the 1st violin part.

Again, twice you break the contour of the original.

There are times where tying to be inventive can also be self-defeating.

In this particular case, the most effective answer to the question is not necessarily the most complex.
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"

amdg

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #26 on: March 03, 2012, 01:36:04 PM »
Hey Everyone:

Here's one that will be a bit of a curveball, but let's see what you all have to say about it!
Thanks.

Brian

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Michel.R.E

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #27 on: March 03, 2012, 02:23:05 PM »
cello in wrong clef.
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

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amdg

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #28 on: March 03, 2012, 02:33:36 PM »
Oops!
 Sorry, stupid mistake.  Here's the correction.

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FossMaNo1

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Re: Orchestration exercise 2: Strings
« Reply #29 on: March 05, 2012, 08:51:47 AM »
Why would you put the cello in that cleff?
C. Foster Payne
Worship Pastor at Chattanooga Valley Baptist Church, martial artist, Cowboy, karateka, father, husband...wannabe composer
"If you get to thinkin' you're a person of some influence, try orderin' somebody else's dog around."