Author Topic: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly  (Read 755 times)

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Timothy01

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The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
« on: July 19, 2020, 11:44:07 PM »
After Ennio Morricone passed away, and the discussion here, I made a point of listening to the theme from The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. I was surprised to find out I knew the tune well, but never in context. The most interesting thing for me is how the human voice with 'wa' syllables is used in unison with the brass to create an effect that sounds synthesized.

RJB54

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Re: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2020, 09:36:35 AM »
Back before synthesizers and computers a lot of ingenuity had to go into creating sounds. If you closely check out the work of The Beatles (who were really into pushing the edge of the envelope in terms of what was possible in a 1960's recording studio) they would spend hours building sounds via overdubbing various  instruments and voices and tape manipulations to get a sonic effect that today would be done by in a couple of seconds by simply clicking a button in a computer dialog box.
Information is not knowledge. Knowledge is not wisdom. Wisdom is not truth. Truth is not beauty. Beauty is not love. Love is not music. Music is THE BEST.
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Timothy01

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Re: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2020, 11:15:34 PM »
Some people might call that 'authentic'.

Jerry Engelbach

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Re: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2020, 02:20:40 PM »
Some people might call that 'authentic'.
Tim,
 
They might.
 
On the other hand, some might consider acoustic overdubbing to be inauthentic, a substitute for actual different voices.
 
I recall that for a certain echo effect, the Beatles recorded something in an empty stairwell. An authentic echo would have been in a concert hall, not a studio.
 
I'm thinking that authenticity depends upon context. A live classical recording is pretty authentic, whereas pop recordings have almost always relied upon effects.
 
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Jer
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Timothy01

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Re: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2020, 11:43:13 PM »
Authenticity - that sounds like an interesting question for discussion. What is authentic?

I'm with you on the overdubbing, etc. A straightforward recording of instruments playing parts at the same time would be authentic there.

To record in an empty stairwell, however, might capture an echo that really exists in the stairwell and not in the concert hall. People can't be present in the stairwell to listen, but the recording will carry the music to its audience - music that the audience would never be able to hear for themselves. The echo is real, the recording is of real instruments playing real parts together in the stairwell. This is a suggestion open to criticism, but could that not possibly be called authentic?

It would be interesting to hear everyone's take on the question of 'authenticity'.

Jerry Engelbach

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Re: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2020, 09:22:56 AM »
Tim,
 
I'm a fan of reproducing in a recording as closely as possible the sound one hears live, in a concert hall, jazz club, or wherever, with as realistic a sound stage as possible.
 
For that reason I prize good audiophile recordings, even though I don't have the budget for truly high-end equipment.
 
Cheers,
Jer
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