Author Topic: Simple puzzle  (Read 212 times)

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Michel.R.E

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Simple puzzle
« on: July 16, 2020, 04:32:42 AM »
This is aimed mostly at our less-experienced members, as a form of exercise in identifying material.

This chord has a particularity, what is it?

If you feel like it, elaborate on the topic, but that's optional.

Describe what it is that makes this chord special.
Can you see a way of using this particularity in a larger context?
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"

NathanM

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Re: Simple puzzle
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2020, 11:55:14 AM »
The chord contains every scale degree in the key of C major. Regarding those follow-up questions, I feel unable to contribute anything of use to the discussion, but I look forward to seeing what other, more experienced members might point out.

Didn't Beethoven write something similar to this in the fourth movement of his ninth symphony?

Nathan

Michel.R.E

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Re: Simple puzzle
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2020, 12:07:34 PM »
can you think of ways to use this type of texture to create harmonic material for a piece?

for example, what happened if you repeated the chord, but with a Bb, Eb, and Ab?

what if you followed that with the same chord but with only an F#?

then again, with only a Bb and an Eb?



"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"

NathanM

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Re: Simple puzzle
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2020, 01:55:32 PM »
Interesting...since it contains every scale degree, I suppose the chord could be used to easily signal the start of a new key by shifting certain notes up or down a half step. I feel as though I'm overlooking the obvious here, so I apologize...when I say I'm a newbie, I really mean it :-\

Is there any special significance in the way you voiced the chord? Why E in the bass instead of C or A?

Michel.R.E

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Re: Simple puzzle
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2020, 02:05:57 PM »
no particular significance. I liked the sound in that voicing.

and YES, that is exactly the point: adding or removing accidentals creates a new "tonal space" in which to function, which is outside of the regular common practice harmonic hierarchy.

basically, the application of this is to give you more latitude to move away from the ordinary I-IV-V classical progression.

At some point soon, I'll be creating a small simplified tutorial on using chord progressions by 3rds (the "Vaughan-Williams" system).
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"