Author Topic: July, 2019 (alternative): Is it OK to seek emotional response with your music?  (Read 785 times)

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sandalwood

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Can the composer legitimately seek eliciting an emotional response from her audiences...or should she just follow her calling and not bother with what people do with her music?


(Schumann:"....applause of the vulgar crowd, fixed gaze of sentimental women...")

Michel.R.E

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does the topic apply to male composers as well?  ;)
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"

sandalwood

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That was a marvelous one-liner! :)

The answer is: Yes, but we reserve the right to hold women above :)


Michel.R.E

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I think the question is an excellent one, and it is a delicate line the composer treads - regardless of gender.

Do you write the music ONLY for the purpose of eliciting an emotional response, using every cliché available, with no thought to your own compositional integrity?

Or do you write what you WANT to write, and build the emotional triggers into your music, in the hopes that they will achieve their desired reaction?

I can say that for myself, I've tried to remain true to my own musical style, while at times aiming for such emotional reactions. Two notable examples would be the finale of my 2nd symphony, and the 2nd and 4th movements of my 3rd symphony.
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"