Author Topic: Lullaby  (Read 367 times)

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mjf1947

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Lullaby
« on: February 04, 2017, 12:32:00 PM »
Okay ...

Here is an idea for a choral work G minor ...... simple in its structure and harmonic movement ..... aiming for sentiment.

Just jotted it down yesterday and today.

It's a Lullaby written for my grandson.

Initial version ..............

I am contemplating working a mid section (I have some ideas) in C minor.

Open to all suggestions/comments/advice appreciated. 

Mark

PS:  AS not to bore the listening with the mp3 ... I only repeated the text once ... although there are 4 refrains.

I caught a few errors in the text and I enhanced the piano accompaniment  ... so the pdf and mp3 are new files.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2017, 08:05:18 AM by mjf1947 »

AO

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Re: Lullaby
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2017, 10:09:37 AM »
Very nice, looking forward to see how it progresses. Have you experimented with slower tempos? I notice you seem to have the default 120.

perpetuo studens

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Re: Lullaby
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2017, 04:14:31 PM »
Nice Mark...very pretty. If you were looking for sentiment I think you found it - this is touching.

I get the impression you are aiming for simplicity here, but I'm hearing orchestral possibilities, and maybe a modulation or two.

Just a few thoughts...

Jamie
The perceived object...is not a sum of elements to be distinguished from each other and analyzed discretely, but a pattern, that is to say a form, a structure: the element's existence does not precede the existence of the whole, it comes neither before nor after it, for the parts do not determine the pattern, but the pattern determines the parts: knowledge of the pattern and of its laws, of the set and its structure, could not possibly be derived from discrete knowledge of the elements that compose it.

That means that you can look at a piece of a puzzle for three whole days, you can believe that you know all there is to know about its colouring and its shape, and be no further ahead than when you started. The only thing that counts is the ability to link this piece to other pieces...

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Ron

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Re: Lullaby
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2017, 04:23:38 PM »
Very pretty. I thought you had switched to a foreign language when I got to "mo ther wat ches" and was trying to figure out what it might be when I went on to the rest of the line.  (In other words, you're missing vital hyphens and should check a hyphenation tool.)


I suggest you could save a lot of real estate by combining the soprano-alto and tenor-bass lines into two staffs. They are lock-step rhythmically, so such a combination is straight-forward--and you've gained nothing by splitting it into 4 staffs. Sustained syllables over multiple notes should be slurred (eg mm 17-19).  :)
Ron
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mjf1947

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Re: Lullaby
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2017, 05:03:03 PM »
Very pretty. I thought you had switched to a foreign language when I got to "mo ther wat ches" and was trying to figure out what it might be when I went on to the rest of the line.  (In other words, you're missing vital hyphens and should check a hyphenation tool.)


I suggest you could save a lot of real estate by combining the soprano-alto and tenor-bass lines into two staffs. They are lock-step rhythmically, so such a combination is straight-forward--and you've gained nothing by splitting it into 4 staffs. Sustained syllables over multiple notes should be slurred (eg mm 17-19).  :)

Thanks Ron for the suggestions - words coming from you ... very well received.  I always enjoyed and respected your choral works.

Marl