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General Category => Chit Chat => Topic started by: Michel.R.E on February 06, 2012, 12:05:26 PM

Title: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on February 06, 2012, 12:05:26 PM
I thought it might be fun for us to occasionally post pieces we are particularly fond of, and maybe talk about what influence they had on our own work/lives.

This is my first recommendation: Frank Martin, Petite Symphonie Concertante (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTkbjOzsLCI&feature=related), for harpsichord, harp, piano, and strings.

This work was one of the first "truly modern" works I ever heard. It was barely 20 years old when I was born. And the mix of 12-tone, of triadic material, of heavy chromaticism and modal writing, was an eye-opener for me.

The last movement is... WONDERFUL.
it's not one of those "emotional" works, it's just.. intellectually stimulating.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: finger on February 06, 2012, 02:26:27 PM
Great idea, Michel. I also love Martin.

Here's George Rochberg's 1'st symphony

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ueRwiK--nTA (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ueRwiK--nTA)

This is a powerful work. Later in his career, Rochberg juxtaposed atonal and tonal elements in his works as early as the 1970's when it was still practically a sacrilege (in academic circles) to do so. I found that inspiring.

Larrance
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on February 06, 2012, 03:59:18 PM
Great idea for a thread because I'll get to know some composers I'm not familiar with. 

Maybe cliche, but Rite of Spring was a piece that greatly influenced me.  At the time I marveled at the complexity and sophistication of all the sounds.  That's abou the level it struck me, but I'll never forget the impression I had when I listened to it.  For quite a while after that I couldn't get enough of Stravinsky.  It's funny but I hardly listen to Stravinsky any more. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on February 06, 2012, 04:05:20 PM
Larrance!!!! the Rochberg is WONDERFUL.

And Steve, there is NOTHING wrong with loving a good solid repertoire standard.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Ron on February 06, 2012, 07:49:24 PM
Like you, Steve, I fell in love the Sacre de printemps when a teenager and bought every recording I could of Stravinski. And, like you, I no longer listen to his music.

As a teenager I also adored Prokofiev--especially for the soundtrack he did for Eisenstein's "Alexandre Nevski (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEJeBNqHshs&feature=fvwrel)."
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on February 06, 2012, 09:21:57 PM
I'm another Stravinsky nut, and I still listen. :)

But what I'd really like to recommend if you can manage to find a recording, is Andrzej Panufnik's "Autumn Music (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_hO92XOSfO8)" (and part 2 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PxKCyyrd7Y)). It's scored for three flutes, three clarinets, percussion, celesta, piano, harp, violas, cellos, and basses. It is beautiful and introspective, and if you're not familiar with it, I promise you've never heard anything quite like it. I would go as far as saying listening to it changed the way I have written music.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on February 06, 2012, 09:23:01 PM
I love Nyevski as well (no idea why they transliterate it as "nevsky".. they're missing the "Y" sound after the "N").

Apparently, James Horner loved it so much he quoted it verbatim in Star Trek: Wrath of Khan.



This was apparently Prokoviev's answer to Sacre du Printemps: Scythian Suite (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fdVbOJrLS4). It's long been one of my favourites by him. The ending is GLORIOUS.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on February 07, 2012, 05:57:22 AM
I'm another Stravinsky nut, and I still listen. :)

But what I'd really like to recommend if you can manage to find a recording, is Andrzej Panufnik's "Autumn Music (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_hO92XOSfO8)." It's scored for three flutes, three clarinets, percussion, celesta, piano, harp, violas, cellos, and basses. It is beautiful and introspective, and if you're not familiar with it, I promise you've never heard anything quite like it. I would go as far as saying listening to it changed the way I have written music.

Wow that is a great piece.  I like the harmonic language alot.  Interesting colors too.  At times I could swear there's a trumpet in there.  I'd like to see a score on this one.  Thanks for bringing this composer to my attention.

So is this a program piece?  ;)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: mjf1947 on February 07, 2012, 06:05:48 AM
La création du monde ....   Darius Milhaud (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgqXq0es4wc)

It just so different!  ..............


Mark
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on February 07, 2012, 07:53:59 AM
Michel,

Thanks for inserting the link to the youtube video for the Panufnik. I sometimes forget how easy it is to find music there. I've updated my post to add the link to the second half as well, since youtube breaks it up.

Wow that is a great piece.  I like the harmonic language alot.  Interesting colors too.  At times I could swear there's a trumpet in there.  I'd like to see a score on this one.  Thanks for bringing this composer to my attention.

My pleasure! This is one composer who deserves a lot more attention, in my opinion. I actually own a score of this work, and it's quite beautiful to look at on the page as well. Unbelievably, Panufnik reconstructed some of his early works completely from memory after having to leave all his possessions behind when he fled Poland in the 50s.

Some of my favorites Panufnik: (I could only find one of these online)
Sinfonia Rustica (Symphony No. 1)
Sinfonia Sacra (Symphony No. 3) pt I (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blmAg6hYzHE) - pt II (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBk9yfxL0g8)
Tragic Overture
Heroic Overture

I'm also a very big fan of both the Scythian Suite and Creation du monde. I had heard the Rochberg only once, and many years ago. Thanks for the reminder. I must be in the right place, because you guys all have great taste!
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on February 07, 2012, 09:42:43 AM
ok, since absolutely NO one here knows that I am a moderate fan of Samuel Barber's music (yeah, right),  I thought I'd post a slightly lesser known work of his, the 2nd Essay (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ha8TvkylbZM&feature=related) for orchestra. It's a mini-symphony. This was one of the most influential pieces on my own musical development.

the 2nd "movement" is a WONDERFUL fugue on a very unlikely subject.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on February 07, 2012, 10:42:41 AM
I love Barber as well.  I just got study scores for his string quartet and his 1st symphony.  Fantastic pieces.  I also prefer the adagio as a quartet over the string orchestra.  I'm also fond of Medea's Meditation and Dance of Vengeance (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKJsLc0YxVs). 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: jmsuijkerbuijk on February 07, 2012, 01:32:25 PM
As a young lad I heard Mahler's "Das Lied von der Erde". Ortrun Wenkel was supposed to sing the alto part but had to forfeit because of illness, regretably; substitute was Janet Baker, whom I hadn't even heard of back then.
The complex simplicity of the music and its straightforwardness struck me very, very deep and had me make up my mind for the rest of my life: I was to write music, regardless.

Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on February 07, 2012, 02:42:46 PM
Most of you probably know this one, but just in case you don't:

Charles Ives - The Unanswered Question (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9QbrhC15XiQ)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on February 07, 2012, 06:15:14 PM
Speaking of Samuel Barber: I find it incredibly ironic that the Adagio for Strings was used in one of the most "anti-war" films ever made... Samuel Barber was an officer in the American airforce, and a staunch patriot. He would most definitely not have approved.

just an anecdote.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on February 07, 2012, 06:23:27 PM
Speaking of Samuel Barber: I find it incredibly ironic that the Adagio for Strings was used in one of the most "anti-war" films ever made... Samuel Barber was an officer in the American airforce, and a staunch patriot. He would most definitely not have approved.

just an anecdote.

True.  And besides, they hacked it all up for the movie.  Disgraceful. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on February 08, 2012, 07:45:32 AM
I'm listening to Rochberg's 1st symphony now and this is something I can really relate to.  What a great thread this is.  I've heard pieces and composers I'd never heard before.  Almost overwhelming in fact. 

I also just listened to his variations on Pachabell's Canon (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xf9_JYLQvA&feature=related) which I typically loathe, but in this case it's breathed some life into that piece for me anyway. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: calebrw on February 09, 2012, 06:23:56 PM
As mentioned in another thread, I just got done listening to Beethoven's Fifth (I know, what an adventurous leap into the lesser known works), but while I had heard various recording from the 70s up until within the last year or two, I hadn't heard a interpretation quite like. It is that of Bruno Walter leading the New York Philharmonic on December 15, 1941.

http://www.archive.org/details/BeethovenSymphonyNo.5_331
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: finger on February 14, 2012, 08:01:59 AM
I love variations. This piece--The People United Will Never Be Defeated By Frederic Rzewski is considered one of THE great piano works; up there with the Goldberg and Diabelli.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k40HVQJZYLM&feature=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k40HVQJZYLM&feature=related)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: RJB54 on February 23, 2012, 09:30:08 AM
Two of the 20th Century pieces which have had a profound effect on my theoretical work and compositional thinking, although until recently, unfortuantely, not so much my actual composing (due to my inability to properly utilize the materials) is Alban Berg's opera Lulu and his Violin Concerto.

I consider the Concerto to be one of the greatest compositions of the 20th Century.

The conventional wisdom requarding Berg is that he was an old-fashioned, backwards looking, composer and an apostate from the true serial faith defined by Schoenberg whose popularity was primarially due to his incorporation of tonal materials and approaches in his work.

However, I feel that the technical/structural thinking and development of compositional tools expressed in these two compositions fully support George Perle's view that Berg was actually the most progressive, forward looking, and deepest thinker requarding exploring all of the possibilities of composing with twelve tones of them all, far surpassing Schoenberg/Webern and their followers.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: jmsuijkerbuijk on February 24, 2012, 01:32:58 AM
I don't know whether Berg was deeper or more progressive than Schönberg or Webern, nor do I know whether that is of any relevance at all, but I do feel that Berg was the most musical one of the three. Berg's music demonstrates expressiveness that one can relate to, that can be felt by listening, not only by reading (Webern's music, i.e., is music to be read, not to be heard, IMO).
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on February 24, 2012, 09:38:20 PM
ok, I'm not sure if I should post this suggestion or not.. but...

here goes:

Puck's song "Were the world mine" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qh-3zBX2wmo), from the film by the same name.

it's NOT classical music, but I really love the very original and inventive instrumentation.

The lyrics, however, are QUITE "classical"... it's Shakespeare, from "Midsummer Night's Dream".

This is one of my favourite films, although it's probably not to everyone's taste. It's sweet, romantic and funny. On top of that, it's beautifully shot, and the music is wonderful. All qualities, coming from a low-budget independent film.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on February 25, 2012, 09:40:47 AM
Bartok used a lot of modes.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Ron on February 25, 2012, 10:00:49 AM
I am listening to Béla Bartók - String Quartet No. 4
Here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XW1nBu2x5zE&feature=related

Very interesting. Would this type of harmonization be classified as modern?
It always sounds as if it's on the edge of collapsing into complete dissonance but never does.

Is this a style of composing? Can this be learned?
I'm going to guess that there are perhaps a lot of minor and major 2nds involved.?



"Modern" is a lot of things. He died in 1945: is that "modern?" Bartok is Bartok. He used a lot of folk music in his works and was influenced by other major composers of his times, such as Strauss, Stravinski,  and Schoenberg.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on February 25, 2012, 11:10:13 AM
all of Bartok's music, from his most tonal, to his most atonal music, were based in some small part at least on some mode or other.

that was his life's work.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Ron on February 25, 2012, 11:12:59 AM
I am serious when I ask, "What is modern?" It means many different things to different people. There is no school of music labelled "modern" if that's what you mean. What we saw in the 20ieth century was music going in many different directions with composers moving back and forth between different techniques and styles as they explored them. Bartok is best known for his work with folk music and using different modes, such as the whole-tone scale.

Why not make up your own mind about where Bartok fits into the history of music? Here's the Wikipedia entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9la_Bart%C3%B3k#New_influences_.281903.E2.80.9311.29 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9la_Bart%C3%B3k#New_influences_.281903.E2.80.9311.29) Pay special attention to the section on the analysis of his music.  :)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on March 26, 2012, 01:40:05 PM
I just wanted to give another plug for Barber's 1st symphony.  I'm studying the passacaglia in particular, but the entire symphony seems to be based on a single musical idea and is a brilliant study in development.  It's brilliantly composed and beautifully orchestrated and is well worth studying.  I bought a study score for around $20 I think. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on March 26, 2012, 02:03:07 PM
Steve, a few details about the 1st symphony that I still remember from when I gave a masterclass on it:

there are three themes, the 3rd of which only really appears again at the end of the Passacaglia (measure 588, or 3 after rehearsal 47).
In the exposition, the themes are as follows:
1st theme - measure 2, E minor
2nd theme - measure 28, F# major
3rd theme - starts in pickup to measure 61, B minor

The Scherzo is built upon the 1st theme, the adagio is built on the 2nd theme. The bass of the Passacaglia is the 1st theme.

Notice a cute detail in the Scherzo: the "trio" section is actually played by "trios" of instruments (three flutes, then three trumpets)

The key relationships between movements are in minor thirds:
1st movement - E minor
2nd movement - Bb major (two minor thirds up)
3rd movement - C# minor (1 minor third down)
4th movement - E minor - home key

So notice that he starts in one key, then moves to what could be considered "the most distant key", an augmented fourth away. Then he gradually returns to his home key by incremental minor 3rds.

Examine the opening measure: built on a stacked series of 5ths - E - B - F#... now look at the keys of his three themes during the exposition. Cute detail, huh?

Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on April 10, 2012, 04:51:44 PM
since the topic of symphonies popped up in various places on the forum in the last few weeks, I thought I'd suggest a work that - to me - is the ultimate "symphony". Tight structure, dramatic, tells a long tale, and is profoundly moving:

Aaron Copland: Symphony no.3

I didn't post a link to Yootoob, because to be perfectly frank, I think anyone who considers himself a composer SHOULD have this work in their library.

By the way, for any of you who don't actually know this particular work, do NOT read up on it before listening to it.

Listen to it with fresh ears.
There is a wonderful "surprise" as the last movement starts... and you really don't want to have that ruined.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: jmsuijkerbuijk on April 11, 2012, 02:40:03 AM
Ran to the CD-shelfs to verify that I do have a recording of the symphony; luckily, I still qualify for considering myself to be a composer. Pfew!
Will try to have a good listen one of these days, because I really can't remember much more of it than the … , well, uh … bonbon at the start of the Molto deliberato.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on April 11, 2012, 05:50:48 AM
I listened through the entire symphony three times yesterday.
I am still totally blown away every time. It moves me to tears.

For some reason, the opening movement connects so profoundly with me.

I am always amazed at the way ALL of the previous material of the symphony returns in the finale, and how it does so effortlessly and seamlessly.

This is one of those works, I think, that might be difficult to take in the first few times. After all, it is HUGE. It's a lot to take in.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on April 11, 2012, 06:02:00 AM
Agreed on the Copeland.  I used to have it on vinyl in fact.  The first time I listened to it I was shocked to hear the last movement (as a brass player).  It's almost overwhelming. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Ron on May 02, 2012, 03:21:24 PM
I wanted to suggest, Beethoven - 7th Symphony - 2nd Movement - Absolutely beautiful and very moving work.


That is my favourite movement in the classical symphonic repertoire.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: suspenlute on May 04, 2012, 09:12:05 PM
My music listening isn't very adventurous yet so most of my "recommendations" would be fairly obvious (although I *am* enjoying exploring everyone else's suggestions).

For what it's worth, the second movement of Kalinnikov's first symphony makes me want to cry like a baby.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: jmsuijkerbuijk on May 05, 2012, 04:27:23 AM
Perhaps less known, but not less by any other means, in my opinion, is the music that has influenced me more than I long cared to acknowledge. Actually, I never realized the kinship there is between this music (orchestration at the very least) and mine until very recently when listening to this again after years:

Alphons Diepenbrock - Die Nacht (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8AypRUaXuRs)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on May 07, 2012, 10:50:01 AM
Reacquainting myself with Prokofiev violin Sonata #2 in D major (https://www.google.com/search?q=prokofiev+violin+sonata+1&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a#hl=en&client=firefox-a&hs=Nrn&rls=org.mozilla:en-US%3Aofficial&sclient=psy-ab&q=youtube:+prokofiev+violin+sonata+1&oq=youtube:+prokofiev+violin+sonata+1&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&gs_l=serp.3...3494.3494.1.3789.1.1.0.0.0.0.111.111.0j1.1.0...0.0.xzOQ93NZcgo&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_cp.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=896fd9c23e2637e0&biw=1280&bih=893).  It's beautifully orchestrated and the last movement is so lyrical.  A wonderful piece I'd forgotten about.  I first became acquainted with it back in college when I was a page turner for the piano accompanists at the International violin competition which was a wonderful experience in itself. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on May 07, 2012, 11:00:23 AM
yeah, always loved the opening movement of that Prokovievv sonata.
I know it in its version for flute and piano (having accompanied an inordinate number of woodwind players over the years).

my violin sonata "par excellence" is the wonderful cyclical Franck violin sonata. The third movement (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9FeIbR6bUY) of which inevitably tears my heart to shreds and moves me to tears.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on May 07, 2012, 11:26:25 AM
That is beautiful.  I also liked the Alphons piece jmsuijkerbuijk posted as well. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on June 08, 2012, 07:46:48 AM
We've discussed symphonies and form here before, and I though this might be an interesting piece for those who are investigating ways of dealing with tonal/triadic material but OUTSIDE of a really traditional harmonic framework.

Roy Harris: Symphony no.3 (in one movement) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_6DzztI5Z4)

I have always loved this piece, for as long as I can remember. It was the flip side of Bill Schuman's wonderful 3rd symphony. I ended up preferring the Harris.

It's in a single continuous movement, much like the Sibelius 7th. With some incredible string writing, and some really amazing orchestral colours.

This and Barber's 1st symphony were always a huge influence on my own music.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on June 08, 2012, 10:40:18 AM
Some nice brass writing as well.  Thank you for bringing this piece to our attention.  I wasn't familiar with it. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: c7music on June 23, 2012, 10:26:01 PM
The piece that had the most profound effect on me is Berio's Sinfonia.  It's the musical equivalent of Finnegan's Wake...
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on July 03, 2012, 12:04:49 PM
a suggestion for anyone who doesn't feel that choral music ever really reached the 20th century:

Samuel Barber, A Stopwatch and an Ordnance Map (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JGQDBgz_TT0)

it is for male chorus, and timpani. it is cruelly difficult to sing (I have the score).

and the words are set to the music in a manner that makes them completely inevitable. this is one of those "perfect moments" in music.

add to that, this is the first time I hear the work performed as perfectly as it is in this particular recording. after hearing this, every other recording is, in my opinion, "wrong".

I highly recommend reading along with the lyrics as it plays.

An added detail about this performance: it is, in my opinion, the first time I hear this work performed by "men". I find most glee clubs (the groups who tend to perform this piece, thinking it is meant for them) sound too "effeminate". There is something inherently "pretty" and un-masculine about the glee club sound.

Even the tenors sound like "men" in this recording.

Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on July 03, 2012, 12:23:46 PM
Thank you for the link, Michel. I was not familiar with this work at all.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on July 03, 2012, 12:38:20 PM
Speaking of 20th century choral music, here's something completely different.

When I was studying at Oberlin, I used to go the music library and pull random scores off the shelf. One day I got hold of an immense score by Penderecki called Utrenja, which depicted the burial of Christ. Looking through it, I did not believe that it could be possible to perform. There were pages with thousands of notes, immense complexity, strange markings, and all for the most massive forces I had ever seen. It was for a huge orchestra with extended percussion, three choirs, and soloists. I just knew there couldn't possibly be a recording of it... or could there?

Of course there was. I took the recording and score to one of the listening rooms, and it completely blew my mind. The orchestra sounds like electronic music when it comes in (bowed percussion galore).

Here is a sampling for those who are not familiar: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcuQFuN3P7U (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcuQFuN3P7U)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on July 16, 2012, 10:39:59 AM
Oh my. yes, I remember we studied Utrenja in University.

And now for something different from moi:

I think this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf711o8jAQA) is one of the most perfect pieces from the "classical" era. It's one of the few I can bear to listen to repeatedly. It's also a divine pleasure actually to play at the piano.. and astoundingly difficult to play as well. The simplicity is quite misleading.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on September 04, 2012, 12:11:07 PM
here's something very interesting:
it's Bartok being very Hungarian.. yet being very "Bartok" at the same time.
You hear the sort of chromatic twisted counterpoint that he develops so brilliantly in Music for Strings Percussion and Celesta mixed with his fascination with Hungarian folkmusic, and his great reverence for Bach's counterpoint.

This is "Cantata Profana" (or "The Nine Splendid Stags")
Part I (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOkgB1VYVfU)

Part II (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30DL9ukHhfg&feature=relmfu)

Part III (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XX5gMTQNPl8&feature=relmfu)

the three parts of the cantata are quite varied and dramatic.

in part I it tells of the 9 sons of an old man who go into the forest to hunt.
They are magically transformed into stags.

in part II, their father comes searching for them, and thinking them merely stags, prepares to kill them. they beg him to relent, telling him who they really are. the father begs his children to return to their home. (very sad this part)
the stags then tell him that it is impossible, with their hoofs and their antlers, they would not be able to live in a house. They belong outside in the forest.

In part III, they return to the forest. I find the finale incredibly sad and moving.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: flint on September 04, 2012, 12:46:23 PM
...it is, in my opinion, the first time I hear this work performed by "men". I find most glee clubs (the groups who tend to perform this piece, thinking it is meant for them) sound too "effeminate". There is something inherently "pretty" and un-masculine about the glee club sound.

Even the tenors sound like "men" in this recording.

Our college chorus professor referred the sections like so:
Sopranos
Altos
Tenors
Men

In my advancing years I've become extremely intolerant of tenor-like singers (not vocalists, of course, but amateurs). When did whining into a microphone become considered a music-like substance?
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on September 04, 2012, 12:55:27 PM
the baritone section of the large professional choir I sang with/conducted/was accompanist for used to refer to the choral sections that way too.. of course, the tenors hated us.

the thing is, we joked SO often about it, that our regular conductor (the one who got the big bucks for standing on stage after I'd done all the hard work) once did exactly that.

Semyon: [in HEAVY Russian accent] Ok, furst let me jhear soprani.
sopranos: "sing..."
Semyon: now, wit alti.
altos join in and screech some (why are there so many failed sopranos in the alto section?)
Semyon: now wit tenori
Tenors join in
Semyon: and now wit the men
sopranos and altos giggle uncontrollably, Baritones and basses smile smugly, and tenors fume...

Of course, it doesn't beat the time we sang the Verdi Requiem and muffed a line... it was supposed to be "Rex Tremendae, majestatis" and of course, we had been joking around and screwing with the lyrics for weeks... and predictably at dress rehearsal, with full symphony, soloists, everything... half the chorus sang "EXCREMENTE Majestatis!" instead of the right lyrics. Let me tell you, it did NOT go over very well.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on September 28, 2012, 01:29:36 AM
Pines Of Rome - Respighi


Respighi was quite the orchestrator.

It's not for nothing the three Roman tone poems are so popular. My personal favourite is "Feste Romane".

Respighi inspired an entire generation of film composers.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on September 28, 2012, 06:13:24 PM
I believe Dover has an inexpensive version of it.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on October 23, 2012, 12:47:28 PM
I know this isn't for everyone, but.. it's one of my favourites:

Nixon in China, the "Cheers" chorus (finale of act 1) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elUoGdPOcAk)

the chorus isn't until near 6 minutes into this recording... but it's all so fascinating.

that chorus kills me every time.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on October 23, 2012, 08:18:21 PM
I remember hearing this many years ago -- thanks for the reminder. I love the pose at the end mid-toast.

I wonder if a contemporary revival of this would still go with casting Americans in the Chinese roles.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on October 23, 2012, 10:22:37 PM
I think the only problem with trying to cast all the Asian characters with actual Asian singers is the relative scarcity of Asian opera singers. Sure, there are some. There are probably many if you search the entire country.  But what are the chances of them all belonging to the same opera company? Remember that roles are cast to hired singers, but choruses are in-house affairs. The chorus members are part of the opera company. It would be unseemly to go off and hire singers from everywhere across the country for a production.

Then consider that the major roles still need to have "solo" performers.  There is a massive difference between a choral baritone and an operatic baritone. Being able to sustain a chorus part for the duration of an opera is quite different from sustaining a solo role for the same duration.

I imagine the Hong Kong opera could easily mount this opera in a convincing manner by hiring American singers for the few Caucasian roles.

If I recall, the production of Porgy and Bess that I saw at the Opéra de Montréal was actually a touring company. In other words, none of the chorus members were actually Opéra de Montréal employees.

Anyway, other than the obvious problem with Porgy and Bess, doing Nixon in China on stage doesn't pose as serious a problem. Remember that what works on stage doesn't necessarily work on the television screen. What we're seeing in the video is not what the audience sees. The audience sees it from MUCH further. Make-up trickery can, in that circumstance, be enough to create a convincing illusion.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on December 10, 2012, 04:41:38 PM
I thought I had posted a link to this piece, guess not.

This is one of my all-time favourite pieces of music.

It's the 2nd movement of Elliot Goldenthal's stunning "Vietnam Oratorio: Fire, Water, Paper" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBfSDOpkv0o).

This is the "Scherzo" movement.

In it he mixes text from the Latin mass, I think some quotes from the Latin requiem service as well.
Along with that is a Vietnamese children's song.. I guess a sort of nursery rhyme.
And about 3/4 of the way through, he brings in the full chorus chanting the names of every military operation in Vietnam...

I really really dare you to remain unmoved by this.

Quick warning: it's a LONG listen. This movement is around 14 minutes long.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on January 19, 2013, 12:26:50 PM
I think I've spoken about this work before.

This is one of my favourite pieces for chorus and orchestra (I have a VERY long list of "favourite" pieces! ;D), Steve Reich's "The Desert Music (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDEVOO0mRYM)", on poems by William Carlos Williams.

Only today I learned the exact makeup of the orchestra, and it is a VERY unusual orchestra.

a rather small chorus, 27 voices: 9 soprani, and 6 each of alto, tenor and bass

woodwinds by 4 (4 flutes, three doubling piccolo,  4 oboes, three doubling english horn, 4 clarinets three doubling bass clarinet, 4 bassoons, with one doubling contrabassoon)

4 horns, 4 trumpets (one doubling on piccolo trumpet), 3 trombones, tuba

a bunch of percussion,

2 pianos, but each played 4-hands!!! (and one doubling on celesta)

and this is the interesting part....
the strings are divided quite extensively:
12/12/9/9/6... but they are placed in three equal groups of 16 string players (4/4/3/3/2), one stage left, one stage center, one stage right.

this is what gives the work a rather peculiar not-quite-chamber-music sound.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on January 25, 2013, 12:26:35 PM
I remember when this piece first came out on CD - I was working at Tower Records at the time. I liked it very much, though my memory is tainted a bit by our having an absolute Reich fanatic working in the classical department. The fact that he gushed over it so much (and played it too often) annoyed me. To be fair, I'm sure I was positively annoying as well with what I played, but still!

In a box somewhere I still have my copy of this on CD. I should probably dig it out. At least I know where my "Different Trains" is. :)

It must be such a luxury to be able to compose something for this kind of unusual ensemble and expect that it will be played anyway. Lately I've been cautious about even including harp or piano in my orchestral works, and have been limiting winds to twos and percussion battery to 3 players. I would love to bust out a giant orchestration like this.

Maybe it's just as well... it would be a lot more work!
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: tbmartin on February 05, 2013, 08:31:28 AM
Arthur Honegger's "Une Cantata de Noel"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vm2T5SSlCGI

The opening is dissonant and dispairing, but oh-so worth it for the contrast that follows. The Quodlibet section is in 18/8 and has inspired me to write combinations of various tunes that might not otherwise go together. (Christmas Lullaby recently posted being one!)

I've sung this several times and my favorite part is "the last 2 inches of the vocal score." The vocal parts have a multimeasure rest, but instead of a number of measures, it simply says "Tacet jusqu'à la fin." During that final few minutes, all the carols of the quodlibet reappear and unwind in glorious fashion, and the piece ends as it began, with a single organ note. This piece is always high on my playlist during December, and I often play it other times of the year as well.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on February 05, 2013, 09:01:16 AM
ahhhh.. Cantate de Noel.... another on my list of favourite pieces.

personally, my favourite part is when the chorus breaks out in jubilant "Laudate Dominum omnis gentes". I feel my entire insides become twisted into one giant knot.

I also love when "Es ist ein Rose ensprungen" comes back at the end.

Aw hell, the entire work is incredible.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: sandalwood on February 05, 2013, 02:48:56 PM
that was really good!

thanks for the recommendation.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on February 07, 2013, 11:31:32 AM
Thank you for the Honegger recommendation.  I can't believe I've not listened to him before.  Listening now to his second symphony for strings and trumpet.  Very interesting stuff. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on February 07, 2013, 05:48:50 PM
May I present:

Carl Nielsen Symphony #5 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJk7GXi-BZQ)

If you don't know this, you owe it to yourself to give it a listen or two.

This has an amazing section (at about 14:45) where the snare drum is at a tempo a little faster than the rest of the orchestra and has the instruction to improvise "as if at all costs he wants to stop the progress of the orchestra". Crazy and very moving at the same time.

This is a great recording I can't believe I found on youtube.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on February 07, 2013, 06:58:29 PM
all of the Nielsen symphonies are great.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on February 08, 2013, 06:50:39 AM
May I present:

Carl Nielsen Symphony #5 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJk7GXi-BZQ)

If you don't know this, you owe it to yourself to give it a listen or two.

This has an amazing section (at about 14:45) where the snare drum is at a tempo a little faster than the rest of the orchestra and has the instruction to improvise "as if at all costs he wants to stop the progress of the orchestra". Crazy and very moving at the same time.

This is a great recording I can't believe I found on youtube.

You're right.  It even says there should be a metronome placed in front of him with quarter = 116.  It is very effective. This is some powerful music. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: tbmartin on March 08, 2013, 05:56:52 AM
My iTunes library has grown significantly because of this thread, in directions I never would have expected. Thanks! Any more suggestions out there?

(ok, so this was just a long-winded "bump". Guilty as charged.)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: suspenlute on March 14, 2013, 05:11:35 AM
This gem is currently, literally RIGHT NOW, forcing me to re-think everything I thought I knew about serial music.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvLDNoFf7Cc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atetAgSl660

Kees van Baaren - Piano Concerto (1964)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: RJB54 on March 14, 2013, 05:55:41 AM
This gem is currently, literally RIGHT NOW, forcing me to re-think everything I thought I knew about serial music.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvLDNoFf7Cc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atetAgSl660

Kees van Baaren - Piano Concerto (1964)

Interesting composition.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on March 14, 2013, 08:44:07 AM
Something different: Passacagla, from Symphony no.3, by Alan Belkin (https://www.webdepot.umontreal.ca/Usagers/belkina/MonDepotPublic/MP3/S3c.mp3)

I was at the premiere. A stunning work. Tonal, modern, original, dramatic.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: RJB54 on March 14, 2013, 08:53:13 AM
Something different: Passacagla, from Symphony no.3, by Alan Belkin (https://www.webdepot.umontreal.ca/Usagers/belkina/MonDepotPublic/MP3/S3c.mp3)

I was at the premiere. A stunning work. Tonal, modern, original, dramatic.

I really liked this, but then again, I like just about all of his works that I've been able to hear. I've downlaoded all the pieces he's posted on his website and I listen to them often.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on March 17, 2013, 05:24:06 PM
I had the pleasure of attending a concert of a local professional chamber orchestra with my daughter where they performed Beethoven's Violin Concerto with the 2010 winner of the International Violin Competition held here in Indianapolis.  It was outstanding to say the least, but the first piece on the concert was by a composer I'd not heard of and an era of music history I generally ignore.  The composer is Biber and he's a late Rennaisance or early Baroque composer.  The piece depicts preparation for and a battle scene and uses some "modern" techniques.  There's nothing new really.  My daughter loved this piece so much she bought it on iTunes. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTpl__FCceU
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: johnc on March 20, 2013, 07:07:57 PM
Charles Ives, "The Unanswered Question"

Piece I stumbled on in the library, Symphony # 3 by Henryk Gorecki:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVITZUQ_uIU

Music for LOW bass fiddle.

John
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on March 21, 2013, 11:38:36 AM

Piece I stumbled on in the library, Symphony # 3 by Henryk Gorecki:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVITZUQ_uIU

Music for LOW bass fiddle.

John

Interesting piece.  I'm not sure I could listen to it over and over.  I'd have to be in a certain mood for sure.  It's slow moving minimalism. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on April 04, 2013, 12:45:03 PM
I ran across this piece today that I'd never heard despite being a Stravinsky nut.  It's his piano concerto for piano and winds.  The orchestration is very interesting and colorful.  I'm not sure there's a full string section. I think he uses basses, woodwinds, brass and percussion. 

Stylistically the thing that struck me is the slow movement.  It seemed much more lyrical and expressive than I've ever heard from Stravinsky.  Maybe it was the interpretation but beautiful nonetheless. 

Part 1 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wyz92osSr7M)
Part 2 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=87t7VRa54Ag&feature=endscreen)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: sandalwood on April 04, 2013, 03:18:52 PM
thanks a lot for the recommendation. being a "slow movements freak" i listened to it with great interest.

the piece reminded me of a book (http://www.gutenberg.ca/ebooks/lambert-music/lambert-music-00-h.html#Travelers) i had mentioned previously in another thread, which contains controversial ideas on many topics. the following is a short excerpt from the chapter on the subject of melody in S's neoclassical period , which, hopefully, some members might find interesting:

"...

To create even a synthetic melody—such as the one in the slow movement of Ravel's concerto—to any degree of satisfaction requires a power of sustained linear construction which it is only too clear Stravinsky does not possess. His melodic style has always been marked by extreme shortwindedness and a curious inability to get away from the principal note of the tune. This was no matter in his earlier ballets where the abrupt fragmentary phrases and the repetition of one insistent note emphasized a barbaric quality which would have been destroyed by the introduction of a long and well-made melody. But the essence of a classical melody is continuity of line, contrast and balance of phrases, and the ability to depart from the nodal point in order that the ultimate return to it should have significance and finality.

That Stravinsky's shortwinded methods are incapable of producing even a satisfactory synthesis of this type of melody we can see by taking a concrete example, the theme which opens the slow movement of his Piano Concerto—a movement which may be said to set the type of Stravinsky's adagios for the next few years. It opens with a two-bar phrase in the eighteenth-century manner—commonplace enough, but still, capable of yielding results of a certain distinction in the hands of a composer such as Vivaldi. Stravinsky, however, is unable to continue this phrase or even find a contrasting two bars. He repeats it with a slight rhythmic variation—the only type of treatment that comes easily to him—twists its tail for a moment and then lets it fall gradually back on itself, the process of extinction being artificially held up by the mechanical application of sequential figures, which derive not from eighteenth-century lyricism, but from eighteenth-century passage work.
..."

a different viewpoint, expressed by j adams, who apparently attaches greater value to the work:

"Here is the famous quote we all know from Stravinsky’s autobiography: “music is, by its very nature, essentially powerless to express anything at all, whether a feeling, an attitude of mind, a psychological mood, a phenomenon of nature, etc….Expression has never been an inherent property of music.”

...It’s hard to believe that Stravinsky, the composer of Symphony of Psalms or of the slow movement of the Concerto for Piano and Winds, could deny that there is meaning in what he’d written"
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on April 05, 2013, 07:57:47 PM
Wow that's quite an indictment on Stravinsky.  Rather than saying "incapable of" maybe he "chose not to" write long winded melodies.  I happen to think his phrases in a larger sense are quite balanced.  Albeit in an odd way but they're always satisfactory to me.  I think it's just a matter of style rather than capability. 

Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on May 15, 2013, 10:48:29 AM
Another musical recommendation:

Rebecca Clarke: Piano trio (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IK9l8ywTcVE&feature=share)

This is an absolutely stunning work, by a relatively unknown composer.
Due to blatant sexism, this very fine composer's musical career was stifled at every turn, despite the majority of her oeuvre being masterfully written.

Her viola sonata is an undisputed masterpiece.
And the above Trio rivals any of the "greats" in the standard repertoire.

I'm hoping to play this piece some time.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on May 15, 2013, 11:55:51 AM
Another musical recommendation:

Rebecca Clarke: Piano trio (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IK9l8ywTcVE&feature=share)

Wow, powerful stuff! Thanks for pointing this out. I had never heard of her.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on May 15, 2013, 12:00:18 PM
Jamie: check out her Viola Sonata (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7zEL6v0PBU)...another incredibly powerful work.

Had this woman been given even HALF a chance, she would have been a force to reckon with in 20th century music.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Brendan on August 14, 2013, 10:26:46 PM
There are a number of contemporary choral composers who I find very inspiring, but Nigel Westlake's Missa Solis - A Requiem for Eli is one I that always moves me.

At small taster is here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duvdnk271Ys (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duvdnk271Ys)

Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on August 15, 2013, 04:27:03 AM
I was curious about this Nigel Westlake, so I looked up a bit more from him and was VERY impressed by his bass clarinet concerto (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S75WldM00PE).
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Brendan on August 21, 2013, 11:05:08 PM
Indeed, that piece has terrific energy. 

And in terms of contemporary Australian composers, I also quite like Carl Vinehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7FZUywNesk (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7FZUywNesk).
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Periwink on October 07, 2013, 11:04:13 AM
I discovered Leoš Janáček today http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PScaxSwGa6o
I am really enjoying his music, especially his piano works.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on October 07, 2013, 11:12:38 AM
I love the Janacek Sinfonietta. Check out Taras Bulba as well.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on October 07, 2013, 11:18:27 AM
I've always found the diminutive title ironic considering the size of the orchestra is positively mahlerian.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Periwink on October 07, 2013, 11:49:48 AM
Great suggestion Jamie. Every time I think I've listened to every great composer there is I discover someone completely new whom I've never even heard of... I love it!
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on October 07, 2013, 01:04:06 PM
I've always found the diminutive title ironic considering the size of the orchestra is positively mahlerian.

Better mahlerian than malarian!
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: jonservative on October 08, 2013, 05:35:49 PM
Speaking of Samuel Barber: I find it incredibly ironic that the Adagio for Strings was used in one of the most "anti-war" films ever made... Samuel Barber was an officer in the American airforce, and a staunch patriot. He would most definitely not have approved.

just an anecdote.

The YouTube link says "Sorry About That," and does not load  ???
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: jonservative on October 08, 2013, 05:38:44 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SaIECNL7D-4

Only listen to this link if you ever want to know what NOT to do.  I have always loved Holst's Planets Suite, especially Jupiter, but I'l stick with the original.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on October 08, 2013, 05:58:47 PM
Speaking of Samuel Barber: I find it incredibly ironic that the Adagio for Strings was used in one of the most "anti-war" films ever made... Samuel Barber was an officer in the American airforce, and a staunch patriot. He would most definitely not have approved.

just an anecdote.

The YouTube link says "Sorry About That," and does not load  ???

what's it supposed to link to?
there was no link in the post you quoted.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: jonservative on October 08, 2013, 06:14:59 PM
I feel like I'm going crazy.  Now I cannot even find the post from which I quoted.  I do admit mixing cold medicines, but I swear it was there, and the link was broken.  Sorry about the confusion.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on October 08, 2013, 07:54:11 PM
None of the Barber links were defective,
however the Belkin link (symphony no.3) has changed places, and I didn't update it (I'll have to contact Alan and ask for the new address), the Roy Harris 3rd symphony link is removed by youtube, and the Rebecca Clarke viola sonata one is removed by youtube as well.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: jonservative on October 09, 2013, 03:01:38 PM
There are a number of contemporary choral composers who I find very inspiring, but Nigel Westlake's Missa Solis - A Requiem for Eli is one I that always moves me.

At small taster is here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duvdnk271Ys (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duvdnk271Ys)

The actual story behind this music is very warming too.  Written for a documentary about the sun, ended up dedicated to his own "son."
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on October 24, 2013, 12:15:07 PM
This is one of my favourite works, and also one of only two "serial" works that I can listen to over and over.

Leonard Bernstein, Symphony no.3 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jX1exz7eORo)

The soprano soloist isn't ideal (Montserrat Caballé... she's a wonderful opera singer, but seems to have some difficulty with intonation in a contemporary work), but it's the composer conducting, with a great orchestra and chorus.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on October 24, 2013, 01:15:46 PM
I love the Kaddish!

I have a very interesting story regarding this piece.

I saw Bernstein conduct this work at the Kennedy Center some time around 1982, I think. I was able to get backstage afterwards and got his autograph on the program, which I still have. Now here is the fun part: When I asked for his autograph, he recognized me!

Some time earlier he helped cut a promotional commercial for the Duke Ellington School of the Arts, where I was attending. I was also in the commercial along with some other classmates (I was "the kid holding the french horn"). During one of the takes (which actually aired), he kissed me on the top of the head.

I had also pestered him once when he was conducting some combined youth groups in a concert of Beethoven's Eroica by handing him one of my early orchestral scores. His handler was trying to shove me away, but he graciously accepted it.

As to the piece itself, I was mesmerized.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on October 24, 2013, 01:21:32 PM
wow, I'm envious!  :o

Bernstein was one of the great musical minds of the century.

What I find sad is how so many relegate him to "he was a conductor"... "who wrote glorified Broadway scores".

His serious works are incredibly profound and very, very well-written. It's far from Broadway pap.

And even his Broadway works are the most complex ever written for the medium.

When I was assistant conductor here, my "mentor" made a comment regarding "Chichester Psalms" for which I think I never forgave him. He referred to it as "just broadway stuff". It's strange how some great musicians can actually know so LITTLE about music in general.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: tbmartin on October 24, 2013, 06:03:42 PM
Chichester Psalms is one of my favorite vocal pieces ever. Very challenging to sing, but so worth the effort! I did an arrangement of the 1st movement for concert band. Took 2 years to do, and the band I play in did a read-thru. It was a HUGE learning experience, even if I never get more than that one read-thru.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on October 24, 2013, 06:46:59 PM
Found it! It was March of 1981, so I had just turned 17.

(http://i41.tinypic.com/2upsqx5.jpg)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on November 02, 2013, 02:11:38 PM
I thought I'd suggest something a tiny bit different today.

Most of us are aware of opera, and of "Broadway musicals"... but there's some middle ground between the two, which Stephen Sondheim trod with great aplomb.

Sondheim - responsible for the lyrics of West Side Story - was also an incredibly fine composer.

His innate sense of "the word" is almost superhuman. Very few other composers have ever come close to his ability at setting test to music to maximum effect.

So here, for your enjoyment (at least, I hope a bit of enjoyment... this is my favourite musical), is the grand finale of act 1 of "A Little night Music":

A Weekend in the Country (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZutBlUXUDI)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on November 03, 2013, 04:30:27 PM
I absolutely love 'A Little Night Music'.  Everything is in 3 correct?  Or at least a triple meter. 

I also like his 'Sunday in the Park with George' score.  This piece is a good example of how he can weave 2 or 3 melodies together and don't they sort of hand off each others' lyrics?  I agree he's a master for sure.  I could kick myself for passing up an opportunity to see him at the IU school of music a couple years ago.  He was giving a master class or a lecture one evening there. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on November 03, 2013, 05:32:24 PM
Yeah, most of Night Music is either squarely in 3, or is in a compound time signature (6/8, 9/8, 12/8).

Sunday is pure genius.. it won the Pulitzer prize, not for nothing.

And for me, Sweeney Todd is the perfect model for a contemporary opera (not the film.. that was absolutely dreadful).

I'd kill to attend a masterclass given by him.

Sondheim has an absolutely uncanny way of finding rhymes within words rather than only looking for them at the end of words... he manages to get one line to rhyme with a syllable in the middle of another word!

Favourite line in Night Music:
"she'd strike you as unenlightened"
"No! I'd strike her first!"
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Periwink on November 04, 2013, 03:58:50 AM
Sweeney Todd is one of my favorite movies!
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on November 04, 2013, 04:37:02 AM
Sweeney Todd is one of my favorite movies!

If you get the chance, see the original Broadway version (there are at least 2 different productions available on DVD, one original cast with Angela Landsbury, the other a recent recording with the San Francisco symphony of a semi-staged version which is INCREDIBLE).

The film really butchered the music.

For example, they removed ALL of the choruses. The opening credits is basically the opening number of the opera - minus the singers. Which is incredibly stupid, as they basically start off the story, and half the music is missing. You're just hearing the ACCOMPANIMENT! LOL none of the actual music that the orchestra is accompanying!

In Sweeney Todd, the chorus functions partially as a Greek chorus and as part of the scenery. It's also freakin' HARD to sing.

Sweeney Todd in concert, amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/Sweeney-Todd-Concert-George-Hearn/dp/B0000648Y0/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1383568409&sr=8-5&keywords=sweeney+todd+dvd)

original cast of Sweeney Todd, amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/Sweeney-Todd-Barber-Broadway-Version/dp/B0013Z7RUC/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1383568409&sr=8-3&keywords=sweeney+todd+dvd)

The "concert" version has certain advantages. Since the premiere 50 years ago, Sondheim has brought some adjustments, fine-tuning if you will, and added a few spots of music which were really missing in the original (the Beggar Woman, for example, had next to nothing to sing).


And here, for your viewing pleasure, is Sweeney Todd in Concert, via youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWA-eRewQrA)

It's great listening to it played by a massive orchestra.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Periwink on November 04, 2013, 10:06:35 AM
I vaguely knew Sweeney Todd was derivaten of something but I never looked it up. I like Sweeney Todd the movie as a movie, not as an opera. I listened to the opening of the youtube link you gave and it indeed sounds very promising! Got to find a place were I can listen to this thing this week. Thanks for the tip!

I like these recommendations. Last week (and still today) I got completely obsessed with Prokofiev's piano concerti which you did recommend somewhere earlier Michel.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on November 04, 2013, 10:24:16 AM
Sweeney! Sweeney! Sweeeeeeee!!!

Yes to the Hearn/Lansbury -- pass on the movie.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on November 04, 2013, 10:30:01 AM
The Sweeney in Concert video is nice for the simple fact that it contains the updated score, with cuts and additions that greatly improve the flow of the opera.

Although to be honest, the actor playing Anthony in that version grates on my very last nerve. As does Patty Lupone as Mrs. Lovett. The rest of the cast are awesome.

I have both on DVD, and because of the improved sound quality of the "in Concert" version, I more often than not listen to that one.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on November 14, 2013, 12:10:50 PM
A gift, from Ralph Vaughan-Williams to all of us.

A "Serenade to music" for 16 solo singers and orchestra.

Serenade to music (lyrics from Shakespeare) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luiHGtu0iXU)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on November 14, 2013, 12:32:20 PM
A gift, from Ralph Vaughan-Williams to all of us.

A "Serenade to music" for 16 solo singers and orchestra.

Serenade to music (lyrics from Shakespeare) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luiHGtu0iXU)

That is beautiful.  I'm glad I know about that piece now.  Thank you. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Ron on November 14, 2013, 01:59:31 PM
Try this out by a young Canadian composer, Scott Good (the 2nd one on the list, "Anguished Grief," tears my heart out): 

https://www.musiccentre.ca/centrestreams/swf?mode=play_by&opt=composer&id=13271 (https://www.musiccentre.ca/centrestreams/swf?mode=play_by&opt=composer&id=13271)

You'll have to create an account to listen, but it is free and gives you access to all the works archived on the Canadian Music Centre--a fantastic reservoir of new music that I have barely begun to explore.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: slksdw on November 14, 2013, 02:16:04 PM
OMG Frank Martin: Petite symphonie concertante

Sorry guys, working my way through this thread from the beginning. Unfortunately, if your post was after the first (Michel R.E.) there may be a delay. I'm absolutely revelling in the music of Frank Martin.

You know what, it's beautiful to listen to , it's even better when you watch it.

MRE thank you for sharing that.

Simon
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Ron on November 29, 2013, 08:43:18 AM
Check this out. I think it is perfectly suited to the setting. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zc535-TxUoQ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zc535-TxUoQ)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Ron on November 29, 2013, 11:40:55 AM
Wow. I love the melody in this Goldsmith soundtrack and the odd contrasting rhythm of the accompaniment.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViR2T-KVwTE (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViR2T-KVwTE)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on December 03, 2013, 09:39:01 AM
I stumbled across this:

Philip Glass,
The Tirol Concerto for Piano and Orchestra.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wk3bjVqVhF4

This is almost exactly the same music as he wrote in 1989 for The Truman Show. Listen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4yK6r6meT0

Seriously - note for note. I guess that's the new definition of "minimalism?"
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on December 04, 2013, 06:39:37 AM
I should point out that I am actually a fan of Glass. I especially love koyaanisqatsi. The only reason I actually noticed that the two pieces were the same was that I'm also a huge fan of the movie "The Truman Show," and the soundtrack is part of what I really like about it. I was just wondering what the deal was, since the youtube page says this was commissioned a few years after the movie.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: sandalwood on December 20, 2013, 07:09:50 PM
i know this is not a forum of baroque lovers, and this is not the best piece to pay homage to one of the best melodists; still, perhaps some members find the piece interesting as i do. rv 169 from il prete rosso :)

this is from bp/karajan

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Psn16zksQx8&feature=related

and this rendition from europe galante, one of the ensembles that pioneer the "authentic"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GW4FPkg1wFc

by the way,

VIVA VIVALDI! :)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: flint on January 13, 2014, 08:24:22 PM
Any suggestions for string orchestra? Preferably no older than Debussy or so... (I want to study, not sleep :P)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on January 13, 2014, 08:34:28 PM
Any suggestions for string orchestra? Preferably no older than Debussy or so... (I want to study, not sleep :P)

It's not just strings, but I HIGHLY recommend Bohuslav Martinu's Double Concerto for two string orchestras, piano and timpani (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9sqT-2f7S4) (nice video with score)

it's one of those "unknown" masterpieces. it's probably Martinu's greatest work, and it deserves to be up there with the Bartok music for strings percussion and celesta.

Do listen to this one all the way through to the end. It has, in my opinion, the most tragic ending of any piece ever written. (Martinu was exiled from his homeland during the war and he wrote this at a time when he thought he might never see his home again)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: flint on January 13, 2014, 09:25:50 PM
Lovely piece, very crunchy.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on January 14, 2014, 10:27:00 AM
That is a very nice piece and as you put it very tragic.  It sort of has a bookend ending which I'm fond of.  Anyway I'm not very familiar with his works so I have more listening to do. 

On another note what do you all think of Malcom Arnold?  I heard his Scottish dances on the radio the other day and as a brass player I've played his brass quintet a number of times.  However I started listening to his symphonies and was really taken by them.  I'm curious what others' thoughts are.  He's a really great orchestrator too.  Very colorful. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on January 14, 2014, 10:35:19 AM
Steve: regarding Martinu, his works are very uneven. His greatest works are masterpiece, his weakest are bad jokes. He is very much like Villa-Lobos in that sense. A huge catalogue, but one that includes many works that are of a considerably inferior quality.


I only know Malcolm Arnold by name, unfortunately. I am not familiar with his music at all. I'll have to have a listen some time.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on January 16, 2014, 06:24:41 AM
I LOVE Martinu! Thanks for the link. I have a box set of his symphonies, but I'm not sure if I've heard that work before.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: mjf1947 on January 16, 2014, 06:36:26 AM
Here's a interesting work "JUBILEE" by GEORGE WHITEFIELD CHADWICK an American Composer.  (There is also a second movement called NOEL)

It is interesting period piece. 

Our community Orchestra will perform it this March.

http://youtu.be/igeCvQODJJY

I wouldn't know how to classify it .... more of a Pops work?  Programmatic? Turn of the century Romanticism?  Fluff?

Mark
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on January 16, 2014, 07:56:06 AM
I LOVE Martinu! Thanks for the link. I have a box set of his symphonies, but I'm not sure if I've heard that work before.

Here's a quick excerpt from one of Martinu's symphonies (no6 "Fantaisies Symphonique") (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8ntmGvSO9Q)

listen to those opening measures.
now, try to imagine what compositional process was used to achieve that effect in the woodwinds.

and I can tell you that you are probably wrong! LOL

Sounds like Ligeti, or Penderecki... but EVERY single note is written down. The rhythms are precise and exact. There is no aleatoric element whatsoever.

Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on January 16, 2014, 08:06:31 AM
That's pretty remarkable.  And all that without a sequencer :)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on January 16, 2014, 08:20:55 AM
That's pretty remarkable.  And all that without a sequencer :)

well he had the old version of a sequencer called "orchestra".
but it relied on a notation interface.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on January 16, 2014, 11:55:10 AM
ROFL.  Yeah I hear that's no longer a development platform for composers. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on January 29, 2014, 03:34:16 PM
OMG Frank Martin: Petite symphonie concertante

Sorry guys, working my way through this thread from the beginning. Unfortunately, if your post was after the first (Michel R.E.) there may be a delay. I'm absolutely revelling in the music of Frank Martin.

You know what, it's beautiful to listen to , it's even better when you watch it.

MRE thank you for sharing that.

Simon

Simon, a funny thing happened today.

I was extracting an MP3 file of this piece to put on my Walkman for a trip into town next week (I'd go nuts on the 3hr ride if I didn't have some music to listen to). I extract the files, every went fine. it put me in the mood to listen to this piece, which remains one of my favourite orchestral works... and I realize "no harpsichord? no prominent piano part? nor harp?!!"

The CD from which I had ripped the MP3 files was of the later re-orchestrated version of this work, for large orchestra.

my first reaction was "ewwwwwww!"

Then I started comparing the two versions, and there are merits to both. The original obviously has more "bite" to it because of the harpsichord/piano/harp combination and the more intimate and intense strings-only accompaniment.

But the large orchestra version brings a more thundering drama to the work, particularly in the final movement.

I couldn't find a YouTube recording of it (the re-orchestration), sadly.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Periwink on February 06, 2014, 12:22:15 PM
I discovered Einojuhani Rautavaara today and I really like his music so far. I wonder if others are familiar with Rautavaara and could give me suggestions of pieces you liked or know of any similar composers you'd recommend? Thanks :)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Gillespie on February 07, 2014, 04:05:08 AM
Milton Babbit's Piano Concerto has always disturbed me, but I can't seem to "look away"  :)

http://youtu.be/Y4dbWh_vthI (http://youtu.be/Y4dbWh_vthI)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Gillespie on February 07, 2014, 04:15:15 AM
Maybe cliche, but Rite of Spring was a piece that greatly influenced me.  At the time I marveled at the complexity and sophistication of all the sounds.  That's abou the level it struck me, but I'll never forget the impression I had when I listened to it.  For quite a while after that I couldn't get enough of Stravinsky.  It's funny but I hardly listen to Stravinsky any more.

ditto.  But every few years I return to his early ballets.  ROS: Sacrificial Dance is heavy metal brutality at its most elegant finest.
http://youtu.be/TLKSQdNmdYE (http://youtu.be/TLKSQdNmdYE)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Brendan on February 07, 2014, 03:26:56 PM
I've just listened to a recording of Aaron Copland's "Three Latin-American Sketches" and Heitor Villa-Lobos' "Bachianas Brasileiras No.9"...had not heard the music of either before, and enjoyed both pieces very much.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on February 07, 2014, 03:34:31 PM
two great works to study, Brendan, by those composers:

Aaron Copland: Symphony no. 3

a GREAT American symphony that readily stands toe to toe with anything composed in Europe. The form is tight, the drama well balanced, the music is incredible. I believe this piece is one one of the 1st pages of this thread. It's always a work i recommend to students.

Heitor Villa Lobos: Concerto for guitar

While Villa Lobos' output is vast and extremely uneven, the guitar concerto is an undisputed masterpiece. It certainly helps that Villa Lobos himself was an excellent guitarist.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Brendan on February 08, 2014, 01:11:12 AM
Michel:

Thanks for this.  I managed to find time to you tube the Copland and listen to the first movement - WOW! The way the textured opening theme builds up in layers to those thundering twin crescendo at about 5 and 7 minutes in, and the last four or so minutes' atmospheric. moody restatement of the opening theme...hairs standing up on my arms and neck, goose-bumps, etc...am definitely rushing out to buy this so I can listen to the whole thing at my leisure!

Hope to listen to the Villa-Lobos soon.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on March 13, 2014, 07:15:54 AM
For those who are curious about saxophone used in a "classical" orchestral setting, this is my favourite sax solo in the entire classical repertoire (fast forward to around 3 minutes).

Rachmaninov: Symphonic Dances, opus 45, 1st movement (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TF1pGMsxX5M)

In my opinion, this is one of the great under-rated masterpieces of the 20th century. It may sound very traditional and "romantic", but it's surprisingly modern in its conception and treatment of the orchestra. It's also an incredibly challenging piece to conduct. Probably the reason so few conductors attack this piece until they are quite advanced in their career.

If you want to treat yourself, listen to the entire piece.

While it's most prominent in the 3rd "dance", Rachmaninov makes prominent use throughout of the Gregorian "Dies Irae" motif. This is the last piece of music Rachmaninov composed before his death in 1943 (yes, he lived most of his adult life IN the 20th century!)

In the 3rd "dance" he also introduces the "Alleluia" movement from his own choral work "Vespers".

The Montreal Symphony are performing this piece next fall and I've invited Ron to join me for the concert. If anyone feels like driving up to Montreal the week of the 4th of November, you're more than welcome to join us. Just let me know enough in advance so I can buy enough tickets.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Periwink on March 13, 2014, 07:37:16 AM
Very beautiful! Haven't heard this piece before, thank you.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: tbmartin on March 13, 2014, 02:06:52 PM
Add another to my list of "must get" pieces. It sure would be nice if "sax in the orchestra" would get beyond "Bolero" and the Old Castle movement from "Pictures at an Exhibition." I know there are more, but these seem to be the only 2 that most people know of.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on March 13, 2014, 04:52:56 PM
Add another to my list of "must get" pieces. It sure would be nice if "sax in the orchestra" would get beyond "Bolero" and the Old Castle movement from "Pictures at an Exhibition." I know there are more, but these seem to be the only 2 that most people know of.

Prokofiev Lt. Kije Suite has a tenor sax solo.  A nice piece of music.  It has a couple of off stage trumpet solos as well. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on March 19, 2014, 01:59:34 PM
This is the music I listened to as a teen, and probably one of the reasons I'm so often puzzled by people who want to be composers and have had absolutely no contact with any music of this sort:

Schuman, symphony #10 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8dXfPU5_H60)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Ron on April 21, 2014, 08:56:53 AM
I stumbled across this this morning. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHAsx_7DSMg#t=180 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHAsx_7DSMg#t=180)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: gogreen on April 21, 2014, 10:56:08 AM
Oh my goodness, Ron. That was spectacular.

Art
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on April 21, 2014, 11:10:24 AM
definitely impressive.
nice to hear music from one so young that is NOT historical rehash.
an interesting unique contemporary voice.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Brendan on May 08, 2014, 04:54:32 PM
Have just listened to a recording of Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony, which I've not heard before.  To describe it as "powerful" would be a significant understatement!

Here is a You Tube link to this same work:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FF4HyB77hQ
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on May 08, 2014, 08:40:50 PM
Have just listened to a recording of Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony, which I've not heard before.  To describe it as "powerful" would be a significant understatement!

Here is a You Tube link to this same work:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FF4HyB77hQ

ahh yes, the greatest most misunderstood masterpiece of the 20th century.
beloved by all, truly understood by so few.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: flint on May 08, 2014, 09:31:40 PM
Prokofiev Lt. Kije Suite has a tenor sax solo.  A nice piece of music.  It has a couple of off stage trumpet solos as well.

Yes... and I'm going to miss my chance by TWO DAYS this year :(

I'll be on vacation on the day of the concert, so the orchestra is going to have to bring in a ringer.


Dagnabit.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Brendan on May 08, 2014, 10:36:11 PM
ahh yes, the greatest most misunderstood masterpiece of the 20th century.
beloved by all, truly understood by so few.

Michel, as this is the first time I've heard this work, would you be able to expand a little more on your observation.... :)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on May 08, 2014, 11:08:08 PM
ahh yes, the greatest most misunderstood masterpiece of the 20th century.
beloved by all, truly understood by so few.

Michel, as this is the first time I've heard this work, would you be able to expand a little more on your observation.... :)

I think I did so in either another thread, or earlier in this one, but I can always repeat it.

Schostakowitch wrote the 5th symphony after being reprimanded after a performance of his opera Lady MacBeth of Mtensk displeased Stalin. (This caused Schostakowitch to temporarily withdraw his 4th Symphony, a TRULY monumental modern symphony). He was called before a "disciplinary committee" and accused of "formalism" (a vague and meaningless accusation that was levied against anyone who displeased the establishment).

He wrote his 5th symphony as a "Soviet composer's response to just criticism" (the subtitle of the 5th symphony).

Superficially, the 5th symphony goes from dark and brooding opening to a glorious and joyful ending. This was, however, a part of DSCH's dark and sarcastic sense of musical humour.

Yes, the work starts darkly, and as such it is very much autobiographical.

However the progression toward "joy" or "triumph" at the end is an illusion. DSCH saw no triumph at all in succumbing to the Soviet elite's quasi-illiterate appraisal of his music.

In fact, the only way to really grasp the "hidden" meaning of the finale of the 5th symphony is to watch it, rather than listen to it.
When the brass blare out the "triumphant" fanfare at the end, examine the strings carefully. It is almost terrifying in its imagery. They are all playing the same bow strokes, in perfect unison, up-down-up-down and so on, like the good little soldiers that they are.
It is the triumph of a totalitarian regime terrorising its citizenry into submission.

With one stroke, DSCH was able to fulfil the required "agenda" of his persecutors - to glorify the soviet regime - and at the same time give his own subversive interpretation of that evil regime's effect on artists.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on May 09, 2014, 05:11:42 AM
Prokofiev Lt. Kije Suite has a tenor sax solo.  A nice piece of music.  It has a couple of off stage trumpet solos as well.

Yes... and I'm going to miss my chance by TWO DAYS this year :(

I'll be on vacation on the day of the concert, so the orchestra is going to have to bring in a ringer.


Dagnabit.

Oh that's a shame.  Hopefully the ringer will represent you well :)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on May 09, 2014, 05:23:01 AM
ahh yes, the greatest most misunderstood masterpiece of the 20th century.
beloved by all, truly understood by so few.

Michel, as this is the first time I've heard this work, would you be able to expand a little more on your observation.... :)

I think I did so in either another thread, or earlier in this one, but I can always repeat it.

Schostakowitch wrote the 5th symphony after being reprimanded after a performance of his opera Lady MacBeth of Mtensk displeased Stalin. (This caused Schostakowitch to temporarily withdraw his 4th Symphony, a TRULY monumental modern symphony). He was called before a "disciplinary committee" and accused of "formalism" (a vague and meaningless accusation that was levied against anyone who displeased the establishment).

He wrote his 5th symphony as a "Soviet composer's response to just criticism" (the subtitle of the 5th symphony).

Superficially, the 5th symphony goes from dark and brooding opening to a glorious and joyful ending. This was, however, a part of DSCH's dark and sarcastic sense of musical humour.

Yes, the work starts darkly, and as such it is very much autobiographical.

However the progression toward "joy" or "triumph" at the end is an illusion. DSCH saw no triumph at all in succumbing to the Soviet elite's quasi-illiterate appraisal of his music.

In fact, the only way to really grasp the "hidden" meaning of the finale of the 5th symphony is to watch it, rather than listen to it.
When the brass blare out the "triumphant" fanfare at the end, examine the strings carefully. It is almost terrifying in its imagery. They are all playing the same bow strokes, in perfect unison, up-down-up-down and so on, like the good little soldiers that they are.
It is the triumph of a totalitarian regime terrorising its citizenry into submission.

With one stroke, DSCH was able to fulfil the required "agenda" of his persecutors - to glorify the soviet regime - and at the same time give his own subversive interpretation of that evil regime's effect on artists.

Wow.  Sort of an ultimate passive aggression. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Brendan on May 09, 2014, 04:09:25 PM
Ooops, Michel, sorry for making you repeat yourself  :-[ But thank-you anyway, that was most illuminating.  :)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Brendan on August 18, 2014, 09:44:39 PM
One the radio over the weekend I listened to a program about two Scandinavian composers I'd never heard of before: Jon Leifs (Iceland) and Harald Saeverud (Norway).  From what I heard of their music on this program I was most intrigued by - especially when I learned that Saeverud had been commissioned to compose incidental music for a post WWII production of Ibsen's Peer Gynt, replacing the better known music by Grieg.

Anyhoo, here is a sample of Leifs' work "Geysir":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgn-OlLuldU

And Saeverud's "Autumn":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5db7riBFWk

Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: perpetuo studens on September 24, 2014, 09:00:51 AM
Samuel Barber's wind quintet Summer Music: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AQH1RlXPkgI

Thanks to Reha (sandalwood) for introducing me to this wonderful work. I love it when I find a new piece that captivates me as this does, even when (perhaps especially when) I have no idea whatsoever how it works. :) (any explanatory comments from those more knowledgeable among us would be most welcome!)

Barber comes up frequently in discussion here, so apologies if this piece had already been recommended.

Enjoy!

Jamie
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on September 24, 2014, 09:23:20 AM
Summer Music was a commission from a group of the very best wind players in the country.
Barber spent a considerable amount of time with each performer, going over what were possibly the most difficult passages of their respective repertoires.
The difficulties are subtle, sometimes questions of tuning between fingerings, sometimes questions of equality of tone between neighbouring notes. Sometimes particularly heinous fingering sequences in otherwise ordinary-sounding passages.

As such, Summer Music is considered one of the most difficult pieces for wind quintet in entire repertoire.

Samuel Barber, born 1910, was trained in the "Brahms" tradition. His earliest works are purely tonal (Serenade for Strings), while his later works  (Piano Concerto, Capricorn Concerto, 3rd Essay) contain a mixture of tonal and non-tonal elements. His famous Piano Sonata (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-YJ5xDBHRnA) combines tonal and serial material to great effect.

His Adagio for Strings started out life as the middle movement of his String Quartet, opus 11 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fu2o8q-hTqk&list=PL31C0A53634B2666A).
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: perpetuo studens on September 24, 2014, 10:27:02 AM
Thanks Michel. More to explore...

Jamie
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Brendan on September 29, 2014, 06:51:42 PM
A powerful rendition of the "Lento e Largo" movement from Gorecki's Symphony No.3, featuring the sublime Isabel Bayrakdarian.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=miLV0o4AhE4
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Ron on October 11, 2014, 11:33:41 AM
I stumbled across this and loved it immediately. D. Buxtehude - Prelude in E minor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efid22WFdqU (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efid22WFdqU)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: MarketBlandings on November 05, 2014, 07:47:52 PM
I'll go right to the top of my list: Enneagram written by Mont Campbell for his 1972 organ trio Egg. Mont was the bass player.

http://youtu.be/eJo7cEan4sM

Just kids of about 24 years of age with not even the best equipment of 1972 available to them....
and yet they come up with one of the most original, exciting and successful pieces I have ever heard.
A kind of Rock and Roll Dumbarton Oaks.
Enjoy!
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: perpetuo studens on November 06, 2014, 01:11:54 PM
I'll go right to the top of my list: Enneagram written by Mont Campbell for his 1972 organ trio Egg. Mont was the bass player.

http://youtu.be/eJo7cEan4sM

Just kids of about 24 years of age with not even the best equipment of 1972 available to them....
and yet they come up with one of the most original, exciting and successful pieces I have ever heard.
A kind of Rock and Roll Dumbarton Oaks.
Enjoy!

Nice! Yes jams with Little Feat while Emerson, Lake and Palmer watch from the control room?

:)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: MarketBlandings on November 06, 2014, 07:22:49 PM
I'll go right to the top of my list: Enneagram written by Mont Campbell for his 1972 organ trio Egg. Mont was the bass player.

http://youtu.be/eJo7cEan4sM

Just kids of about 24 years of age with not even the best equipment of 1972 available to them....
and yet they come up with one of the most original, exciting and successful pieces I have ever heard.
A kind of Rock and Roll Dumbarton Oaks.
Enjoy!

Nice! Yes jams with Little Feat while Emerson, Lake and Palmer watch from the control room?

:)
The piece is based on the rythmic figure that is stated plainly at 30 to 40 seconds. A figure that seems to be a free-standing unit of it's own - w/o any real bar lines.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Brendan on December 03, 2014, 03:33:03 PM
I've recently discovered the work of the Latvian composer Peteris Vasks.  My favourite is his sequence of "Silent Songs", but this "Pater Noster" is also very beautiful.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bImW2Qu08Ns
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: sandalwood on January 29, 2015, 09:31:13 AM
this, actually is not a recommendation in the strict sense , but reminded by the recent posts with latin rhythms, here's stravinsky's tango for those who would be interested and are not already aware of the piece. dates around the middle of his neoclassical period.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VcXTFRXenwI

as i came here to post this message i saw Brendan's last message for a vasks piece   which, at the time, has somehow escaped my attention. it is just beautiful, thanks Brendan! as i had, once upon a time in the forum, included vasks pieces in a partial list of musicks :) that emotionally affect me, i take this opportunity to provide a link to one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8Fqo9sc9BY

ps. i must have contracted ravelitis, i hear him even in this unlikely piece.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Brendan on February 20, 2015, 02:43:39 AM

as i came here to post this message i saw Brendan's last message for a vasks piece   which, at the time, has somehow escaped my attention. it is just beautiful, thanks Brendan! as i had, once upon a time in the forum, included vasks pieces in a partial list of musicks :) that emotionally affect me, i take this opportunity to provide a link to one:


Sorry, I've been offline for a bit with health stuff again, so I've just seen this...but thanks for the link, I thought that was a beautiful piece...the more I discover about this composer, the more I like his work! :)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: perpetuo studens on February 26, 2015, 01:27:36 PM
The Victoria Symphony Orchestra is doing a new music festival featuring works by Gerald Barry. I hadn't heard of him so I googled a bit and stumbled across a performance of his Triorchic Blues: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=81lTk091L0g

And here's his Piano Quartet 1: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0eUBCBjunrc
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Brendan on August 14, 2015, 04:37:46 AM
Listened to Arvo Part's "Cantus In Memorium Benjamin Brittan" today for the first time...extraordinarily beautiful and moving!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3B4YWCj1a4
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on August 20, 2015, 10:40:57 AM
If you're in the mood for some dodecaphonic music check out Jerry Goldsmith's "Music for Orchestra" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxZAsIQjBo8). 

I'm always fascinated by film composers who write concert music.  At least the film composers with real compositional chops. 

I know Bernard Hermann wrote a symphony and John Williams has a pretty extensive concert catalog.  Eric Korngold wrote some concert music although not terribly interesting in my opinion. 

Any others worth mentioning? 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on August 20, 2015, 12:04:17 PM
HA! I actually have that Goldsmith CD.

Try Elliot Goldenthal's "Fire, Water, Paper: A Vietnam Oratorio". The 2nd movement, "Scherzo (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBfSDOpkv0o)", is one of my favourite choral/orchestral works.
Goldenthal is a very serious composer, who happens to have done film music. He's written extensively for the stage.

While not an absolutely "brilliant" piece of music, James Horner actually wrote a double concerto for violin and cello called "Pas de Deux (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0ZoomQfCXg&list=PLH9C08qrQ7S7SNGWB9LVMrKkIumbMMvK1&index=1)"  It has its strong moments, and it has a few weaker spots.

By the way, John Williams very recently wrote a hefty "Scherzo (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSeBexXaNo4)" for piano and orchestra for the pianist Lang Lang. It's a VERY modern work when compared to most of his other music.

"Soundings (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tNkVKVYZlog)" is one of my favourite John Williams concert works, along with his 1st violin concerto. This seems to be the only complete recording. Sadly, it's not performed in the hall it was meant for, which means some of the extra-instrumental effects are lost.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jamie Kowalski on August 21, 2015, 06:57:38 AM
I'm always fascinated by film composers who write concert music.  At least the film composers with real compositional chops.

Prokofiev wrote a few film scores. And I'm pretty sure he's a Doctor of Chopology!
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on August 21, 2015, 07:19:09 AM
I forgot about the Elliot Goldenthal piece.  You've mentioned that before and I've listened to some of that.  It is a beautiful work.  I've listened to the Horner piece and I feel the same as you about it. 

I'm listening to Soundings now and I really like that.  There must be a few pieces that are recorded?  They appear to be off stage section solis where he stops conducting.  So either they're pre-recorded or there's someone conducting off stage. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on August 24, 2015, 02:31:45 PM
those are pre-recorded.

Soundings was written for the new Disney concert hall in Los Angeles, and the idea was to create a dialogue between the orchestra and the concert hall itself.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Periwink on October 15, 2015, 03:11:04 AM
Hey, I recently discovered the music of Tristan Keuris, I really enjoy the works I listened to this far and thought some of you might like them as much as I do. I personally never heard of this composer before.  Here are some of his works:



Music for violin, clarinet, piano (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDHBJVCGawA) ~10min
Laudi (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNrTpSekA1M) ~40min, long one with soloists, 2 choirs, and orchestra
Violin concerto (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWJQGiWkxMQ) ~25min
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on May 11, 2016, 12:29:28 PM
I don't know if anyone's familiar with this piece but I was almost shocked to hear this piece (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjGwIwmv-lY) written by a young Stravinsky.  I'm familiar with his classical symphony that is very traditional but this sounds like a completely different composer when you're maybe more familiar with where he ended up. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on May 11, 2016, 12:56:31 PM
I have the score to a very early Bartok piece, for piano left-hand, and it's basically Brahms-for-one-hand.

Here's another stunning Strawinski piece, the same year as Sacre du Printemps, but FAR more adventurous.

It's dedicated to Debussy:

Le Roi des Étoiles (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wKC9vgSX24E) for male chorus and orchestra.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: winknotes on May 12, 2016, 08:35:49 AM
That's a great piece.  The opening sounds like Symphony of Psalms to me. 
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: sandalwood on June 23, 2016, 08:42:07 AM
Two pieces you may like, like I did.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_LUu45cHPc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGPn-QJLEIU

The first is Bailero Lero, from Chants d'Auvergne (1925), a collection of Langue d'Oc folk songs, arranged and orchestrated by J Canteloube (his miserable political personality not endorsed).

Second is Fuga con Pajarillo (1990), pajarillo being a South American dance, by A Romero  of Venezuela. Beside the beautiful piece you may enjoy the fiery violin playing. I remember the player (correctly I hope) from some HIP Baroque music ensembles.

Warmest greetings to Saltamontes, by the way.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: whitebark on January 30, 2017, 09:25:57 AM

This is my first recommendation: Frank Martin, Petite Symphonie Concertante (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTkbjOzsLCI&feature=related), for harpsichord, harp, piano, and strings.


That Frank Martin piece is wonderful.  What a find!

I have a soft spot for Uuno Klami's work, like his first symphony:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJIdnFuwD4I&t=12s

or his homage to Handel:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VeBcWyEAp3c
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: sandalwood on March 23, 2017, 06:30:01 AM
Hey, I recently discovered the music of Tristan Keuris, I really enjoy the works I listened to this far and thought some of you might like them as much as I do. I personally never heard of this composer before.  Here are some of his works:



Music for violin, clarinet, piano (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDHBJVCGawA) ~10min
Laudi (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNrTpSekA1M) ~40min, long one with soloists, 2 choirs, and orchestra
Violin concerto (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWJQGiWkxMQ) ~25min

Thanks Periwink, he's really good! He surely has a way with vocal music, especially.

...and I'd burn in hell if I didn't say I have a growing liking for A Belkin's music (many found on the tube); becoming a great fan!
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on March 23, 2017, 09:15:56 AM
Alan's violin concerto is his masterpiece. it's a truly fantastic work, moving, and gripping, and fascinating.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: whitebark on March 24, 2017, 07:17:02 PM
The Belkin Violin Concerto is a nice one!  Here is the YouTube link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MV0wkpvJJRQ

-Jay
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: sandalwood on March 25, 2017, 05:18:18 AM
I suggest you check all his works :)

and definitely not omit the orchestral works.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: sandalwood on August 20, 2017, 04:38:17 PM
A Caucasian shepherd a capella

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvpU5eQVIck

with warm greetings to Whitebark
 :)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on August 20, 2017, 05:00:59 PM
Alan Belkin has a cello concerto coming out soon, and quite honestly, It's even MORE beautiful than the violin concerto.
I got a preview of it the other day.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: sandalwood on January 11, 2018, 09:30:36 AM
Not music but C Kleiber,  a man of "musics", mostly viennaise. I don't know how I have missed this documentary

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ta8Tqjn7Suo&t=530s

until now. For me, personally, Kleiber's charisma even has an element by which people become fans of Gaga, for instance. Perhaps some of you might find the film worth watching, too.

Experimenting flirting with Celibidache nowadays. Would that be infidelity?

By the way, I have listened to Belkin's cello concerto on S.cloud, it's a delight! Very engaging!
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: luke on January 13, 2018, 03:57:57 PM
Nikolai Kapustin
is a Ukrainian (born in Ukraine Soviet Socialist Republic) classical jazz pianist-composer and he is largely the inspiration for most of my composition styles. He uses very distinctive and inventive harmonies and writes clever pianistic passages. Though he is obscure in the west, his work is relevant in repertoire among students as well as professional pianists, including Yuja Wang, Yeol Eum Son, and Marc-André Hamelin. There is a likelihood at least a couple of people on this form have heard of him; there are many of threads on Piano World where users who appreciate Kapustin discuss his obscurity and their desire to spread his music.

-

His Piano Sonata No. 2 https://youtu.be/1nKmkryShXw (https://youtu.be/1nKmkryShXw) (Marc-André Hamelin) is regarded as one of his greatest works. All of the movements are fantastically sublime, jazzy, contemporary, and emotional.

Piano Concerto No. 4 https://youtu.be/-qNIy4pEm1U (https://youtu.be/-qNIy4pEm1U) (Ludmil Angelov) is also an amazing work, in my opinion, written for piano, strings, drum set, timpani, flute, oboe, and clarinet.

His most iconic works are his 8 Concert Etudes, Op. 40, several of which hold places in my and many others' hearts. (Ones I highly recommend listening to before you die in bold + italics.)
No. 1 "Prelude" - https://youtu.be/JKkAA5FKk7A (https://youtu.be/JKkAA5FKk7A) (Kapustin)
No. 2 "Reverie" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBcyDISbyik (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBcyDISbyik) (Katharina Treutler)
No. 3 "Toccatina" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OiSf6jvXvT0 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OiSf6jvXvT0) (Charles Richard-Hamelin)
No. 4 "Reminiscence" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5-OwkNoOK5c (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5-OwkNoOK5c) (Shan-shan Sun)
No. 5 "Raillery" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wyyXLxiigyc (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wyyXLxiigyc) (Daniel del Pino)
No. 6 "Pastorale" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8UDy-8CBfc (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8UDy-8CBfc) (Kapustin)
No. 7 "Intermezzo" - https://youtu.be/9FvzPVofjyU?t=159 (https://youtu.be/9FvzPVofjyU?t=159) (Yeol Eum Son - also played No. 6 and No. 8 in the same video)
No. 8 "Finale" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JSsUJOd-3Rs (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JSsUJOd-3Rs) (Marc-André Hamelin)

-

Prelude by Kapustin was the first work I heard from him after my teacher had me sight read it when I was 12. I think it was truly the first piece that impacted me emotionally and exposed me to a world of music I could appreciate. His etudes are beautifully pianistic and extremely fun to practice, perform, and hear.

I've also listened to several of the suggestions in this thread and everybody's tastes are very interesting and I like this variety. I feel like putting Kapustin in here is sudden and slightly off-topic because his music is mostly tonal and not extraordinarily unique in any aspect; he gained influence in a quite restricted world during his early years, if you read his biographies. However, his music is still fresh; he is alive today at 80 years old.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jerry Engelbach on January 14, 2018, 11:15:58 AM
Luka,
 
Thank you. Very exciting. His language is jazz-based.
 
Much of it reminds me of Art Tatum.
 
Did you really sight-read that first piece? I'm impressed.
 
Cheers,
Jer
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: luke on January 14, 2018, 06:24:06 PM
Luka,
 
Thank you. Very exciting. His language is jazz-based.
 
Much of it reminds me of Art Tatum.
 
Did you really sight-read that first piece? I'm impressed.
 
Cheers,
Jer

I can definitely hear Art Tatum in Kapustin's works - his Etude No. 7 sounds much like Tatum's rendition of "Tea for Two."

I didn't sight-read as in play it full tempo while reading it for the first time right off the bat; that would be unreal. I usually just mean reading it and playing it under tempo, which may have hesitations and mistakes. :laugh:

Luke
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: perpetuo studens on January 15, 2018, 12:00:30 PM
Tatum for sure, but I also heard Keith Jarret and Bill Evans in the sonata.

Jamie
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Ron on February 02, 2018, 12:26:28 PM
Alan Belkin recommended this and I was totally blown away: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUf67ycFhsU (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUf67ycFhsU)  Carl Nielsen, Symphony No. 5.[color=var(--ytd-video-primary-info-renderer-title-color, var(--yt-primary-text-color))][/color]
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on March 19, 2018, 02:11:57 PM
I missed his birthday this year, dealing with a couple of issues of my own.

So to honour one of the great composers of the 20th century, the last notes from his pen:

Canzonetta for oboe and strings (https://youtu.be/ohSDITL79n8)
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: whitebark on March 21, 2018, 10:57:10 AM
Ahh, that Canzonetta is lovely!
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: sandalwood on April 04, 2018, 03:35:52 PM
Not really a recommendation but a piece which some of you may find interesting, composed by F Nietzsche.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIOIUlDB5yU

It is also interesting that one of the comments mentions Schoenberg's Friede auf Erden.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Ron on November 05, 2018, 08:38:38 AM
I've been checking out Penderecki's symphonies lately. Listened to No. 3 this morning and was blown away. I was in tears during the 3rd movement as it vividly brought to mind the falling of the World Trade Center towers, though it was written much before. The 4th movement strongly hints at "Le sacre du printemps." Here's a link to a YouTube recording: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_a2pfwKjIY
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: tbmartin on November 30, 2018, 05:51:36 AM
If you celebrate Christmas, here are 3 pieces that (in my opinion) deserve more playtime:

Honegger's "Une Cantate de Noel."  If you're looking for snowflakes and dancing sugarplums, then the opening section will be tough sledding, but isn't that kind of how life is? The mash-up of carols in 18/8 time is masterful, and how he unwinds all those carols in the finale is quite possibly my favorite few minutes of music.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shTDEWgHNgQ

Vaugh Williams's "Hodie." More traditional than the Honegger. Narration of the Christmas story by children's choir, songs by shepherds, a march for the 3 kings, mixed in with poetry by John Milton.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mh0CmBQFhEI

Dave Brubeck's "Fiesta de la Posada". I had the distinct pleasure of performing this work with Dave Brubeck himself at the piano, TWICE!
There aren't many performances of Posada on YouTube, so this will have to do:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t6kK1Tzl1f8

Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: RJB54 on November 30, 2018, 02:18:29 PM
Dave Brubeck's "Fiesta de la Posada". I had the distinct pleasure of performing this work with Dave Brubeck himself at the piano, TWICE!

How cool that you got to play with him! I really like Brubeck's stuff.

I was lucky enough to perform several pieces each with Buddy Rich and Clark Terry with my college jazz band. We also performed several full concerts with Bill Watrous (because we came cheap and he couldn't afford to pay for a professional big band at that point  ;D).
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: tbmartin on December 01, 2018, 07:01:18 AM
Dave Brubeck's "Fiesta de la Posada". I had the distinct pleasure of performing this work with Dave Brubeck himself at the piano, TWICE!

How cool that you got to play with him! I really like Brubeck's stuff.


In my case “play” means I was a singer in the ensemble. Even so, it was awesome!
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: @ADR2Music on July 24, 2019, 09:58:23 PM
I'm sorry to have come to this thread so late, but I'm very glad that I decided to read it all the way through from the beginning.  So many wonderful suggestions, names and works which I can't wait to explore in greater depth.  I'm grateful to you for expanding my awareness.

I noticed as I read through all of the posts that a couple of my favorite works weren't mentioned, so I thought I'd throw them out for consideration.

Ned Rorem, Symphony No. 3 (1958)
The entire work is, in my humble opinion, glorious; but the Passacaglia and Andante are especially moving to me.  I find Rorem's harmonic language very comfortable.  If you haven't heard this piece, I hope you'll give it a listen.  Here's a link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRaVopqAheA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRaVopqAheA)

Walter Piston, Symphony No. 2 (1943)
I think Piston's work is tremendously engaging, not at all stuffy or academic as he's often described.  The second theme of the Moderato is playful and dance-like; it reminds me of Copland and it contrasts so beautifully with the primary theme, which can be very dark.  Here's a link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5cgDTGomV0 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5cgDTGomV0)

Best,
Allen
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: perpetuo studens on November 24, 2019, 03:42:04 PM
I'm sorry to have come to this thread so late, but I'm very glad that I decided to read it all the way through from the beginning.

I created a spreadsheet with all of the links from this thread up until the last year or so. Happy to share if anyone is interested.

Jamie
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: perpetuo studens on November 24, 2019, 03:43:39 PM
Gideon Klein: Trio for Violin, Viola and Cello
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=is8x0PXKDF8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=is8x0PXKDF8)
Title: The music of Charles Tournemire
Post by: whitebark on February 28, 2020, 04:20:55 PM
Tournemire is another neglected composer who lived from  1870 to 1939. He was well known for his organ music and also wrote 8 symphonies, which encompass a late romantic style in the earlier ones to a modern style all his own in the later ones.  I've never known our local symphony orchestra to play any of his works.  That goes with the classical music radio station, too.

A good introduction to Tournemire's modern style is the 7th symphony, which features light and colorful textures. Like much of Tournemire's work, this symphony is not "heavy" or overly serious.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRWt1oizptQ&t=1441s

I always enjoy listening to his tuneful "Moscow" symphony, which is in his early romantic style:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vExShHDeHQo

Enjoy!
Jay
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: sandalwood on February 28, 2020, 05:30:23 PM
Thanks a lot Jay! He's good, really good imho. Very interesting clarity of expression and an almost frightening facility in orchestral writing. Wikipedia says he was a classmate of Lekeu, a favorite of mine.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: mjf1947 on February 29, 2020, 07:42:49 AM
Thanks for sharing ..... He writes lovely Oboe lines~!  8)

Mark
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: SallyS on March 16, 2020, 07:36:35 AM
Thanks for the introduction to Martin. Very interesting... I will study him further.
With being very interested in voice.... One influential piece for me many years ago was Peter Maxwell Davies 'Eight Songs for a Mad King'. I love the drama and the humour.... and it made me think a little more 'out of the box'.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: mjf1947 on April 16, 2020, 06:35:36 AM
Many people know Nino Rota from his movie scores; however, there is a large body of work that exists beyond that genre.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bK5-60WCHVo

There is much more to admire and enjoy on YouTube.

Mark
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: gogreen on August 25, 2020, 09:57:08 AM
Last Saturday was sci-fi night, so we watched The Last Starfighter (1984). The score was by Craig Safan. We'd seen the movie many times before, but for some reason, I listened intently to the score this time--it's wonderful. I suggest renting or streaming the movie and listening to its terrific score!

Art
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: mjf1947 on August 25, 2020, 10:08:28 AM
Art,

This is one of my most liked Scifi scores.  I actually contacted the composer to see if I could rent the music for our orchestra.  Unfortunately it didn't come to pass.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdk2hOnuFhk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdk2hOnuFhk)

Wonderful themes indeed~!  ;D

Mark

PS: It's also a delightful movie.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jerry Engelbach on August 25, 2020, 12:59:50 PM
Spectacular, Mark.
 
Well, since we're getting into film music ...
 
One of my favorite film composers is Patrick Doyle. I especially love his score for Sense and Sensibility.
 
No bells and whistles here. Just superb scoring for strings and woodwinds, perfectly evoking the bittersweet romanticism of most of the film.
 
This is from the last three minutes of the film, when Doyle brings together the motifs he's been hinting at throughout the story, in a glorious catharsis.
 
Throwing the Coins (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUuXRfy5jSY), from Sense and Sensibility.
 
Cheers,
Jer
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: mjf1947 on August 25, 2020, 01:59:42 PM
And of course let's not forget Korngold.  And other Golden age composers ......................

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42NqTuTDTGE (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42NqTuTDTGE)

Mark
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jerry Engelbach on August 28, 2020, 07:53:26 AM
I'm currently reading an interesting book on the subject, Listening to Movies: the film lovers guide to film music (https://www.amazon.com/Listening-Movies-Lovers-Guide-Music/dp/0534263690/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Listening+to+Movies%3A+the+film+lovers+guide+to+film+music&qid=1598626199&sr=8-1).
 
It's a bit over-priced. But one can download and read it for free from Open Library (https://openlibrary.org/works/OL3918007W/Listening_to_movies?edition=listeningtomovie0000karl).
 
Cheers,
Jer

Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: gogreen on August 31, 2020, 06:55:34 PM
I've always thought Dmitri Tiomkin's score for "The Thing from Another World" (1951) was inspired. By the way, James Arness played The Thing because he was 6'7".
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jerry Engelbach on September 01, 2020, 10:30:22 AM
I've always thought Dmitri Tiomkin's score for "The Thing from Another World" (1951) was inspired. By the way, James Arness played The Thing because he was 6'7".


Ah, there's one I hadn't thought of. Thank you.
 
Yes, Tiomkin's music for that film was as frightening as the story.
 
Cheers,
Jer
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: gogreen on September 01, 2020, 04:47:25 PM
"The Thing from Another World" has been one of my favorite movies for years. The short story from which the movie is derived is "Who Goes There?," by John W. Campbell.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on September 01, 2020, 06:17:17 PM
John Carpenter's "The Thing" is almost a literal transposition to film of "Who Goes There".
The 1st film is radically different from the story.
"The Thing" is among my favourite films, and that story by Campbell is absolutely terrifying.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Patrick O'Keefe on September 01, 2020, 07:21:14 PM
And of course let's not forget Korngold.  And other Golden age composers ......................
Korngold also wrote concert music.   I very much like his violin concerto.   
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Michel.R.E on September 01, 2020, 09:04:43 PM
And of course let's not forget Korngold.  And other Golden age composers ......................
Korngold also wrote concert music.   I very much like his violin concerto.

the violin concerto is basically one of his film scores rearranged as a violin concerto.
once he got to Hollywood he nearly stopped writing anything other than film music.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: gogreen on September 02, 2020, 07:04:35 AM
Quote
The 1st film is radically different from the story.

I think the filmmakers in 1951 altered the story to be more of an allegory for "the Communist threat."

Quote
"The Thing" is among my favourite films, and that story by Campbell is absolutely terrifying.

It is, indeed. The story idea is so compelling, I can see why developing it into many interpretations is so tempting.
Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: Jerry Engelbach on September 02, 2020, 08:41:10 AM
I think the filmmakers in 1951 altered the story to be more of an allegory for "the Communist threat."
Yes, as emphasized by the ending to "watch the skies." The moment when the men spread out in a circle on the ice and realize that they've discovered a flying saucer is accompanied by absolutely chilling music.
 
One of the best things about the film is the wit in the fast-paced overlapping dialogue. The director, Christian Nyby, worked under the influence of Howard Hawks. Nyby had originally been Hawks's film editor, and after The Thing he worked mostly in television.
 
Cheers,
Jer

Title: Re: Musical Recommendations thread
Post by: gogreen on September 02, 2020, 09:36:26 AM
Now I'm going to have to watch it again this weekend.  :)
I see there's a colorized version! My DVD is B&W. If the colorized version is worth it, I'd order it from Amazon. Anyone have it?