Author Topic: Which reigns supreme: Text or Music  (Read 6334 times)

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Patrick O'Keefe

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Re: Which reigns supreme: Text or Music
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2011, 02:56:29 PM »
It must have been code words for sex. A lot of what I didn't understand when I was young was usually related to some aspect of sex, mainly because adults tried to hide it from us.
Hmm.

Mares eat oats,
And does eat oats,
And little lambs eat ivy.
And kids will eat ivy, too.  Wouldn't you?

I don't care to dig into your parents' sex life, but I don't think there too many code words for sex there.   :)

Oops.  I see Brian just beat me too it. 

Pat
« Last Edit: July 27, 2011, 03:01:48 PM by pokeefe »

Ron

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Re: Which reigns supreme: Text or Music
« Reply #16 on: July 27, 2011, 04:24:26 PM »
They taught me in university never to take things at face value; there's always a hidden meaning in text--usually about sex.
Ron
Rules? What rules?

Michel.R.E

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Re: Which reigns supreme: Text or Music
« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2011, 05:31:12 PM »
Lol, yes, I've known those lyrics for a long time. I linked to a recording of the song on the final word of the lyrics I posted.
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"

Michel.R.E

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Re: Which reigns supreme: Text or Music
« Reply #18 on: August 09, 2011, 10:30:19 AM »
I've used this phrase before, but perhaps some day, some composer will come along and drag vocal music kicking and screaming into the late 19th century. Until then, I'll usually just pass on it.

hehehe, I always liked your quote regarding vocal music. I thought it was "kicking and screaming into the 20th century"?

But to be fair, much contemporary harmony IS more difficult to sing.
And one also needs to consider that there are really very few completely professional choruses, where every singer can sight-read and has good-to-perfect intonation.

The two vocal works I recently posted here are about as "modern" as I think I'd dare to compose, going by my experience as both singer and conductor. Without solid instrumental support, most choruses are simply incapable of handling the dissonances required by most contemporary musical languages.
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"