Author Topic: Choral rehearsal  (Read 388 times)

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sandalwood

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Choral rehearsal
« on: November 24, 2017, 07:26:38 AM »
Just felt guilty not to share this with those who, like me, have never been to a choral/vocal "répétition"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Cy-7kAW3mo

many, many experiences, ideas and tips; for ex. the one at 1:00:00 being just one.

and a side note: wouldn't banning English in vocal music significantly help abate overall human misery? ;D :P 8)

Ron

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Re: Choral rehearsal
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2017, 07:35:44 AM »
and a side note: wouldn't banning English in vocal music significantly help abate overall human misery? ;D :P 8)

Probably. When I was young I sang in choirs, both mixed and male, and in vocal quartets. We spent a lot of time figuring out how to enunciate each syllable. All those "s" sounds are a bitch to sing, let alone all the words that end in hard consonants. On the other hand, if we all spoke Italian (or even Spanish), think how beautiful all vocal music would be. :)
Ron
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Michel.R.E

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Re: Choral rehearsal
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2017, 08:16:36 AM »
I don't think English is the problem as far as bad consonants are concerned.

Carmina Burana has a movement where for an entire verse or so, each line ends with "-is".

Try singing Russian some time: Twelve consonants, one vowel, twelve more consonants, and a glottal stop. Honestly, it has more in common with Klingon than any other human language.

French has such severe structural rules for syntax that every single sentence in French has the exact same rhythm. It's VERY boring to set to music. And those silent syllables! *pulls hair from head*


But if you want to hear English perfectly set to music, listen to anything by Stephen Sondheim. Regardless whether it is "high art" or "merely Broadway", it is THE most perfect setting of text of any work in the English language, and worthy of years of study.
"Writing music to be revolutionary is like cooking to be famous: Music’s main function is not revolution. – Alan Belkin "

"Saying something new about something old is still saying something new. – Jamie Kowalski"