Author Topic: Why You Should Learn to Use MIDI data in Finale and Garritan  (Read 1380 times)

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Gillespie

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I'm revising a 2 year-old orchestral piece and updating it with Garritan's GPO 5 and JABB 3.  As an exploration exercise, I ran the JABB 3.0 trumpet through a few of its MIDI controllable features.  The attached demonstrates trumpet doits, falloffs, kisses, vibrato, breath noise, valve noise, and variable intonation.  All of these were added within Finale 14.5--no plug-ins or DAWs necessary.

Let me know if you have questions; perhaps I can help.

Regards,
Clay Gillespie

gogreen

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Re: Why You Should Learn to Use MIDI data in Finale and Garritan
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2016, 07:40:50 AM »
I've never liked the trumpet sounds in any of the Garritan libraries I own--GPO4, GPO5, COMB, and COMB2. Out of the box they're way too tinny and thin for my tastes. I always turn down the highs in the equalizer 4 to 8 notches.

Gillespie

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Re: Why You Should Learn to Use MIDI data in Finale and Garritan
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2016, 01:02:34 PM »
Good idea with the EQ.  The 5 trumpets in JABB are each a little different tone wise; there is one quite a bit darker than the others.

sandalwood

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Re: Why You Should Learn to Use MIDI data in Finale and Garritan
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2016, 05:41:01 AM »
I'm revising a 2 year-old orchestral piece and updating it with Garritan's GPO 5 and JABB 3.  As an exploration exercise, I ran the JABB 3.0 trumpet through a few of its MIDI controllable features.  The attached demonstrates trumpet doits, falloffs, kisses, vibrato, breath noise, valve noise, and variable intonation.  All of these were added within Finale 14.5--no plug-ins or DAWs necessary.

Let me know if you have questions; perhaps I can help.


I'd like to hear anything you are willing to share about the use of MIDI data in Finale: settings, details, etc. I guess more of us can follow you with GPO4 instruments as examples. Thanks and sorry for not noticing before.

gogreen

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Re: Why You Should Learn to Use MIDI data in Finale and Garritan
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2016, 06:10:54 AM »
Quote
I'd like to hear anything you are willing to share about the use of MIDI data in Finale: settings, details, etc. I guess more of us can follow you with GPO4 instruments as examples.

In my experience with Finale and GPO4, GPO5, and COMB2, the main ingredient to making a rendering sound more real is finding the right amount of reverb. For most of my works--both large and small ensembles--I use Convolution reverb with the larger concert hall  choices. I most often set the reverb for most instruments between the 12 o' clock and 2 o' clock positions. Bass instruments sometimes get a little less. Experiment to see what sounds right with your music and resources. I don't use a DAW. As an example, attached are the Bank 1 Aria settings (woodwinds) for my recently posted concert band piece "Turn Signals."

In finale, I also change many note durations with the MIDI tool, adjusting for phrasing, and more realistic wind and brass rendering (players have to breathe). I do the same with strings for phrasing and lifting the bow. I shorten selected notes by 95% to 60%, depending on what sounds more real to me.

I should probably be using a DAW. Still, making the right adjustments as I've mentioned brings a rendering more to life and can change the entire character of a piece.

sandalwood

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Re: Why You Should Learn to Use MIDI data in Finale and Garritan
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2016, 10:53:53 AM »
Thanks Art :)

tbmartin

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Re: Why You Should Learn to Use MIDI data in Finale and Garritan
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2016, 03:10:28 PM »
I've never done any of this stuff. Finale 2003a, right out of the box. For my sax quartet work (vast majority of what I've done so far), that has been fine. I can use my imagination to get a sense of what it will really sound like.

But, now that I'm doing more with concert band works, I might have to venture into this.  Not looking forward to it, but if it's necessary....
Terence Martin

Tools: Finale 2003 on Windows XP
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Goal: Improve quantity and quality of concert band compositions.
Play: Saxophones (all, but tenor primary), Bass Clarinet, Piano (poorly)

perpetuo studens

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Re: Why You Should Learn to Use MIDI data in Finale and Garritan
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2016, 04:36:01 PM »
I use MIDI tool manipulations quite a bit to tweak levels, although HP doesn't always play nicely with the adjustments (notes not sounding because I lower their volume and HP does the same). I've also used it to make some tempo adjustments from time to time when the rit or accel doesn't behave quite as I'd like.

This is all at a much lower level of sophistication than Gillespie's (excellent) suggestions though...

Jamie
The perceived object...is not a sum of elements to be distinguished from each other and analyzed discretely, but a pattern, that is to say a form, a structure: the element's existence does not precede the existence of the whole, it comes neither before nor after it, for the parts do not determine the pattern, but the pattern determines the parts: knowledge of the pattern and of its laws, of the set and its structure, could not possibly be derived from discrete knowledge of the elements that compose it.

That means that you can look at a piece of a puzzle for three whole days, you can believe that you know all there is to know about its colouring and its shape, and be no further ahead than when you started. The only thing that counts is the ability to link this piece to other pieces...

Georges Perec - Life: A User's Manual